Related topics: cells · immune response · cancer cells · protein

Essential mechanism of symbiosis found in Hawaiian squid

(Phys.org) —Experiments at UW-Madison with a small squid that glows in the dark have uncovered a complex conversation that allows the newly hatched squid to attract the glowing, symbiotic bacteria that disguises it against ...

Cells eat themselves into shape

The process cells use to 'swallow' up nutrients, hormones and other signals from their environment – called endocytosis – can play a crucial role in shaping the cells themselves, scientists at the European Molecular Biology ...

Atomic insights into how plant steroid hormone makes plants grow

If one wants to better understand how plants grow, one must analyse the chemistry of life in its molecular detail. Michael Hothorn from the Friedrich-Miescher-Laboratory of the Max Planck Society in Tübingen and his team ...

Researchers synthesize asymmetrical glycans

A team of investigators from the University of Georgia recently demonstrated the first method for synthesizing asymmetrical N-glycans. According to the study, published in the journal Science on July 25, the approach could ...

DNA nanorobots find and tag cellular targets

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center, working with their collaborators at the Hospital for Special Surgery, have created a fleet of molecular "robots" that can home in on specific human cells and mark them for ...

Gold 'nanoprobes' hold the key to treating killer diseases

Researchers at the University of Southampton, in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Cambridge, have developed a technique to help treat fatal diseases more effectively. Dr Sumeet Mahajan and his group at the ...

Water droplets prefer the soft touch

(Phys.org) —Researchers have found a way to drive water droplets along a flat surface without applying heat, chemicals, electricity, or other forces: All that's required is varying the stiffness of the surface in the desired ...

Long distance calls by sugar molecules

All our cells wear a coat of sugar molecules, so-called glycans. ETH Zurich and Empa researchers have now discovered that glycans rearrange water molecules over long distances. This may have an effect on how cells sense each ...

page 13 from 23