Related topics: cells · immune response · cancer cells · protein

SARS-CoV-2 uses sugars to invade human cells

Sugars found on the surface of human cells influence COVID-19 infection, according to a University of Alberta-led study that is one of the first to observe this relationship and suggests that cells in the brain might be particularly ...

Frizzleds are dynamic, molecular machines

Maria Kowalski-Jahn and Hannes Schihada, two postdocs in the Schulte laboratory, have used a novel technology of fluorescently labeling receptors with a minimally invasive technique and detecting structural rearrangements ...

Manufacturing stem cells in a bioreactor

With the aid of artificial stem cells, it will soon be possible to establish new treatments for previously incurable diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. At the Fraunhofer Project Center for Stem Cell Process Engineering ...

Centriole instability might contribute to some cases of microcephaly

Centrioles are cylindrical structures involved in the generation of microtubules—fibers inside of cells that form a network to provide structure and shape to cells and to mediate transport processes. In addition, centriole ...

Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

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