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Soft Matter news

Putting some skin in the turbulence game

An algorithm that improves simulations of turbulent flows by enabling the accurate calculation of a parameter called skin friction has been developed by KAUST researchers in collaboration with researchers at the California ...

dateJan 09, 2018 in Soft Matter
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Unusual thermal convection in a well-mixed fluid

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University, have recently discovered unusual thermal convection in a uniform mixture of high- and low-viscosity liquids. Kobayashi and Kurita found that concentration fluctuations are enhanced ...

dateDec 15, 2017 in Soft Matter
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Controlling a vortex using polymers

A vortex in the atmosphere can churn with enough power to create a typhoon. But more subtle vortices form constantly in nature. Many of them are too small to be seen with the naked eye.

dateNov 28, 2017 in Soft Matter
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Spiky ferrofluid thrusters can move satellites

Brandon Jackson, a doctoral candidate in mechanical engineering at Michigan Technological University, has created a new computational model of an electrospray thruster using ionic liquid ferrofluid—a promising technology ...

dateJul 11, 2017 in Soft Matter
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How fluids flow through shale

Most of the world's oil and natural gas reserves may be locked up inside the tiny pores comprising shale rock. But current drilling and fracturing methods can't extract this fuel very well, recovering only an estimated 5 ...

dateMay 02, 2017 in Soft Matter
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Nature plants a seed of engineering inspiration

Researchers in South Korea have quantitatively deconstructed what they describe as the "ingenious mobility strategies" of seeds that self-burrow rotationally into soil. This is an example of the many ways nature uses biological ...

dateApr 24, 2017 in Soft Matter
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Lasers measure jet disintegration

There are many processes, such as propulsion, in which fluid in a supercritical state, where the temperature and pressure put a substance beyond a distinguishable liquid or gas phase, is injected in an environment of supercritical ...

dateApr 18, 2017 in Soft Matter
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New bubbling mechanism discovered in physics

A group of researchers at Zhejiang University's State Key Laboratory of Fluid Power and Mechatronic Systems, in Hangzhou, China, recently discovered that a new bubbling mechanism may exist within the realm of physics.

dateApr 11, 2017 in Soft Matter
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Inventing a new kind of matter

Imagine a liquid that could move on its own. No need for human effort or the pull of gravity. You could put it in a container flat on a table, not touch it in any way, and it would still flow.

dateMar 24, 2017 in Soft Matter
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Underwater vehicle design inspired by schools of fish

It is easy to speculate why fish might swim in schools—better protection from predators, improved foraging capability, easier fish-to-fish communication. Yet, none of these reveal why fish might move together in a specific ...

Experts investigate how order emerges from chaos

Igor Kolokolov and Vladimir Lebedev, scientific experts from HSE's Faculty of Physics and the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, have developed an analytical theory binding the structure ...

Blocks of ice demonstrate levitated and directed motion

Resembling the Leidenfrost effect seen in rapidly boiling water droplets, a disk of ice becomes highly mobile due to a levitating layer of water between it and the smooth surface on which it rests and melts. The otherwise ...

How water flows near the superhydrophobic surface

Water has an unusual property when it flows closely to some specially designed surfaces—its speed isn't equal to zero, even in the layer that directly touches the wall. This means that liquid doesn't adhere to the surface, ...

Measuring the flowing forces and bending on aquatic plants

Beneath the surface of rivers and streams, aquatic plants sway with the current, playing an unseen but vital role in the life of the waterway. Through a new series of experiments that model these underwater undulations, researchers ...

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Designing the next generation of hair dyes
Pigments in oil paintings linked to artwork degradation
Circadian regulation in the honey bee brain
Study: Pulsating dissolution found in crystals
Hubble weighs in on mass of three million billion suns
Quick quick slow is no-go in crab courtship dance

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