Uncovering Polynya: Research unravels 43-year-old mystery in Antarctica

Uncovering Polynya: Research unravels 43-year-old mystery in Antarctica
The Maud Rise Polynya of September 2017. Credit: NASA Worldview

A study led by NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Research Scientist Diana Francis has unraveled the four decade long mystery surrounding the occurrence of a mid-sea Polynya - a body of unfrozen ocean that appeared within a thick body of ice during Antarctica's winter almost two years ago.

The Maud-Rise Polynya was spotted in mid September 2017 in the center of an ice pack in Antarctica's Lazarev Sea, causing researchers to question how this phenomenon occurred during Antarctica's coldest, winter months when ice is at its thickest. Due to its difficult access location, NYUAD scientists used a combination of satellite observations and reanalysis data to discover that cyclones (as intense as category 11 in the Beaufort Scale) and the that they carry over the ice pack cause ice to shift in opposite directions, which leads to the opening of the Polynya.

At the time of the discovery, the Maud-Rise Polynya was approximately 9,500 square kilometers large (equivalent to the landmass of the state of Connecticut), and grew by over 740 percent to 800,000 square kilometers within a month. Eventually, the Polynya merged with the once the ice started to retreat at the beginning of the austral summer months. Prior to 2017, this phenomenon has only been known to have occurred in the 1970s when satellite observations started to become more commonly used, and has baffled scientists ever since.

  • Uncovering Polynya: Research by NYU Abu Dhabi unravels 43-year-old mystery in Antarctica
    Sea ice concentrations from satellite observations shown in colors and wind speed from ECMWF Era 5 renalaysis superimposed in contours. The black hole is the polynya when it first appeared on Sept. 14, 2017, under the dynamical forcing of persistent strong cyclonic-winds of more than 20 m/s for more than 6 hours over the area. Credit: SCAR ATLAS
  • Uncovering Polynya: Research by NYU Abu Dhabi unravels 43-year-old mystery in Antarctica
    The impact of cyclonic winds on the sea ice drift creating ice-free area near the center of the cyclone by pushing the ice in divergent directions all around it. Credit: SCAR ATLAS

"Once opened, the Polynya works like a window through the sea-ice, transferring huge amounts of energy during winter between the ocean and the atmosphere." said Francis. "Because of their large size, mid-sea Polynyas are capable of impacting the climate regionally and globally as they modify the oceanic circulation. It is important for us to identify the triggers for their occurrence to improve their representation in the models and their effects on climate.

"Given the link between Polynya and cyclones we demonstrated in this study, it is speculated that Polynya events may become more frequent under a warmer climate because these areas will be more exposed to more intense cyclones. Previous studies have shown that under , polar activity will intensify and extratropical cyclones track will move toward Antarctica which could decrease the sea-ice extent and make Polynya areas, closer to the cyclones formation zone," she added.


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Massive hole reopens in Antarctic sea ice

More information: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, DOI: 10.1029/2019JD030618
Journal information: Journal of Geophysical Research

Citation: Uncovering Polynya: Research unravels 43-year-old mystery in Antarctica (2019, April 24) retrieved 22 May 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-uncovering-polynya-unravels-year-old-mystery.html
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Apr 24, 2019
Would open water like this cause increased snowfall locally due to lake effect snow as is common in the northern US and Canada during the early part of winter?

Apr 24, 2019
What possible purpose does this research accomplish? The science is settled, is it not? That means we know everything we need to know, enough at least to predict the weather 100 years out. Obviously, a polynya must not matter very much if that is the case. Stop wasting money on climate science and start spending that money on mitigation --- sea walls and birth control.

Apr 26, 2019
What possible purpose does this research accomplish? The science is settled, is it not?


Not according to the article: "It is important for us to identify the triggers for their occurrence to improve their representation in the models and their effects on climate.

"Given the link between Polynya and cyclones we demonstrated in this study, it is speculated that Polynya events may become more frequent under a warmer climate".

We simply don't know much about them. Oh, and how they affect our global warming climate.

But instead you claim - against evidence and without reference - that we can predict "weather", mistaking it for climate. (Weather prediction goes 1-2 weeks out, currently. Global climate prediction goes tens of decades out.)

Mitigation is cheapest to fight the greenhouse gases, say stop coal plants within a decade. "Birth control" is not needed, Earth will hit peak population in 1-2 decades.

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