The Journal of Geophysical Research is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the American Geophysical Union 80 times per year. It contains original research on the physical, chemical, and biological processes that contribute to the understanding of the Earth, Sun, and solar system. It has seven sections: A (Space Physics), B (Solid Earth), C (Oceans), D (Atmospheres), E (Planets), F (Earth Surface), and G (Biogeosciences). All current and back issues are available online for subscribers. The journal was originally named Terrestrial Magnetism by the American Geophysical Union s president Louis Agricola Bauer in 1896. It was entitled Terrestrial Magnetism and Atmospheric Electricity from 1899–1948. In 1980, three specialized sections were established: A: Space Physics, B: Solid Earth, and C: Oceans. Subsequently, further sections have been added: D: Atmospheres in 1984, E: Planets in 1991, F: Earth Surface in 2003, and G: Biogeosciences in 2005. The scopes of the current seven sections, published as separate issues, are: Each of the sections has one or more editors who are appointed by and serve at the pleasure of the President of the American Geophysical Union for terms of

Publisher
American Geophysical Union
Country
United States
History
1896–present
Website
http://www.agu.org/journals/jgr/
Impact factor
3.303 (2010)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Russian Arctic warming leads to major ice loss

Glaciers and ice caps in two archipelagos in the Russian Arctic are losing enough meltwater to fill nearly five million Olympic-size swimming pools each year, research shows.

Scientists discover a new auroral feature on Jupiter

The SwRI-led Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) orbiting Jupiter aboard NASA's Juno spacecraft has detected new faint aurora features, characterized by ring-like emissions, which expand rapidly over time. SwRI scientists determined ...

Jupiter's Great Red Spot feeds on smaller storms

The stormy, centuries-old maelstrom of Jupiter's Great Red Spot was shaken but not destroyed by a series of anticyclones that crashed into it over the past few years.

Gravity mission still unearthing hidden secrets

Despite ESA's GOCE mission ending over seven years ago, scientists continue to use this remarkable satellite's gravity data to delve deep and unearth secrets about our planet. Recent research shows how scientists have combined ...

Mars Express unlocks the secrets of curious cloud

When spring arrives in southern Mars, a cloud of water ice emerges near the 20-kilometer-tall Arsia Mons volcano, rapidly stretching out for many hundreds of kilometers before fading away in mere hours. A detailed long-term ...

New model more accurately predicts how massive glaciers melt

New research by a team that included a Johns Hopkins engineer promises to enable more accurate ice-flow predictions, helping scientists better forecast how melting glaciers will contribute to rising sea levels, which have ...

page 1 from 25