The Journal of Geophysical Research is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the American Geophysical Union 80 times per year. It contains original research on the physical, chemical, and biological processes that contribute to the understanding of the Earth, Sun, and solar system. It has seven sections: A (Space Physics), B (Solid Earth), C (Oceans), D (Atmospheres), E (Planets), F (Earth Surface), and G (Biogeosciences). All current and back issues are available online for subscribers. The journal was originally named Terrestrial Magnetism by the American Geophysical Union s president Louis Agricola Bauer in 1896. It was entitled Terrestrial Magnetism and Atmospheric Electricity from 1899–1948. In 1980, three specialized sections were established: A: Space Physics, B: Solid Earth, and C: Oceans. Subsequently, further sections have been added: D: Atmospheres in 1984, E: Planets in 1991, F: Earth Surface in 2003, and G: Biogeosciences in 2005. The scopes of the current seven sections, published as separate issues, are: Each of the sections has one or more editors who are appointed by and serve at the pleasure of the President of the American Geophysical Union for terms of

Publisher
American Geophysical Union
Country
United States
History
1896–present
Website
http://www.agu.org/journals/jgr/
Impact factor
3.303 (2010)

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Waves in thin air with broad effects

Mars has a very thin atmosphere, with nearly one hundredth the density of ours on Earth, and gravity pulls with little more than one third of the strength we feel on our planet. As a result, dust storms can go global. For ...

Geothermal energy: Drilling a 3,000-meter-deep well

Although stopping climate change is challenging, it is imperative to slow it down as soon as possible by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. But how can we meet the growing energy demand while reducing our use of polluting ...

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Rapid intensification is a serious challenge for the prediction of hurricane intensity. An example is Hurricane Maria in 2017, which intensified to a Category 5 storm within 24 hours and destroyed Puerto Rico. None of the ...

Lightning 'superbolts' form over oceans from November to February

The lightning season in the Southeastern U.S. is almost finished for this year, but the peak season for the most powerful strokes of lightning won't begin until November, according to a newly published global survey of these ...

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