Dark matter detector observes rarest event ever recorded

Dark matter detector observes rarest event ever recorded
The XENON1T dark matter collaboration has observed the radioactive decay of xenon-124, which has a half-life of 1.8 X 1022 years Credit: XENON1T

How do you observe a process that takes more than one trillion times longer than the age of the universe? The XENON Collaboration research team did it with an instrument built to find the most elusive particle in the universe—dark matter. In a paper to be published tomorrow in the journal Nature, researchers announce that they have observed the radioactive decay of xenon-124, which has a half-life of 1.8 X 1022 years.

"We actually saw this decay happen. It's the longest, slowest process that has ever been directly observed, and our was sensitive enough to measure it," said Ethan Brown, an assistant professor of physics at Rensselaer, and co-author of the study. "It's an amazing to have witnessed this process, and it says that our detector can measure the rarest thing ever recorded."

The XENON Collaboration runs XENON1T, a 1,300-kilogram vat of super-pure liquid xenon shielded from cosmic rays in a cryostat submerged in water deep 1,500 meters beneath the Gran Sasso mountains of Italy. The researchers search for (which is five times more abundant than ordinary matter, but seldom interacts with ordinary matter) by recording tiny flashes of light created when particles interact with xenon inside the detector. And while XENON1T was built to capture the interaction between a dark matter particle and the nucleus of a xenon atom, the detector actually picks up signals from any interactions with the xenon.

The evidence for xenon decay was produced as a proton inside the nucleus of a xenon atom converted into a neutron. In most elements subject to decay, that happens when one electron is pulled into the nucleus. But a proton in a xenon atom must absorb two electrons to convert into a neutron, an event called "double-electron capture."

Double-electron capture only happens when two of the electrons are right next to the nucleus at just the right time, Brown said, which is "a rare thing multiplied by another rare thing, making it ultra-rare."

When the ultra-rare happened, and a double-electron capture occurred inside the detector, instruments picked up the signal of electrons in the atom re-arranging to fill in for the two that were absorbed into the nucleus.

Researchers observe slowest atom decay ever measured
The photodetectors of the inner detecor of XENON1T were tested in liquid xenon in the UZH laboratory. Credit: Xenon Collaboration

"Electrons in double-capture are removed from the innermost shell around the , and that creates room in that shell," said Brown. "The remaining electrons collapse to the , and we saw this collapse process in our detector."

The achievement is the first time scientists have measured the half-life of this xenon isotope based on a of its radioactive decay.

"This is a fascinating finding that advances the frontiers of knowledge about the most fundamental characteristics of matter," said Curt Breneman, dean of the School of Science. "Dr. Brown's work in calibrating the detector and ensuring that the xenon is scrubbed to the highest possible standard of purity was critical to making this important observation."

Researchers observe slowest atom decay ever measured
The electronics to select the photodetectors were developed and built at the UZH. (Image: Xenon Collaboration) Credit: Xenon Collaboration

The XENON Collaboration includes more than 160 scientists from Europe, the United States, and the Middle East, and, since 2002, has operated three successively more sensitive liquid detectors in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy. XENON1T, the largest detector of its type ever built, acquired data from 2016 until December 2018, when it was switched off. Scientists are currently upgrading the experiment for the new XENONnT phase, which will feature an active detector mass three times larger than XENON1T. Together with a reduced background level, this will boost the 's sensitivity by an order of magnitude.


Explore further

A silent search for dark matter

More information: Observation of two-neutrino double electron capture in 124Xe with XENON1T, Nature (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41586-019-1124-4 , https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1124-4
Journal information: Nature

Citation: Dark matter detector observes rarest event ever recorded (2019, April 24) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-dark-detector-rarest-event.html
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Apr 24, 2019
Dark matter is a supersolid that fills 'empty' space, strongly interacts with ordinary matter and is displaced by ordinary matter. What is referred to geometrically as curved spacetime physically exists in nature as the state of displacement of the supersolid dark matter. The state of displacement of the supersolid dark matter is gravity.

The supersolid dark matter displaced by a galaxy pushes back, causing the stars in the outer arms of the galaxy to orbit the galactic center at the rate in which they do.

Displaced supersolid dark matter is curved spacetime.

In the Bullet Cluster collision the dark matter has not separated from the ordinary matter. The collision is analogous to two boats that collide, the boats slow down and their bow waves continue to propagate. The water has not separated from the boats, the bow waves have. In the Bullet Cluster collision the galaxy's associated dark matter displacement waves have separated from the colliding galaxies, causing the light to lense

Apr 24, 2019
Hey! Xenon-124 detected decaying in real time.

A bonus for advanced research into theoretical sciences.

Certainly an amazing achievement.
Makes clear how unpredictable the process of radioactive decay can be.
Especially for the exotic isotopes.

Goes to show, that "half-life" is not just a childish game.
But a very serious result of a stochastic reality.

Apr 24, 2019
"This is a fascinating finding that advances the frontiers of knowledge about the most fundamental characteristics of matter," said Curt Breneman, dean of the School of Science. "Dr. Brown's work in calibrating the detector and ensuring that the xenon is scrubbed to the highest possible standard of purity was critical to making this important observation."

LOL In their desperation to find this Dark Matter and to be the first ones to accomplish the impossible, this bunch is knowingly tricking the public into accepting the magical fluffy unicorn hoax that purportedly 'advances the frontiers of knowledge' - 'most fundamental characteristics of Matter'.
The ~95% of the known and estimated Universe is not made of quantum particles, as the ~5% remainder is made of Matter/Energy. Xenon is an atomic particle which also makes it another example of Matter/Energy - that Matter/Energy that was created In The Beginning of this Universe.
Using a known atomic particle to find DM is silly

Apr 24, 2019
Dark matter is a supersolid that fills 'empty' space,
They laughed, the fools...

Apr 24, 2019
Another Dark Matter Doh-doh!
This is the most blatant example of bad science. Circular reasoning and logic will not give the right answer.
Also, the headline is discordant with the text of the article. In fact, quite clearly a dark matter fail, as none was detected.
What we have after much, much $$$ is a detector which can only tell us about how Xenon-124 exclusively interacts with the REST of the universe. Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha. :-)

Apr 24, 2019
In fact, quite clearly a dark matter fail, as none was detected.
How many gravitational wave fails happened, before one was detected? How many detectors were built that failed to detect gravitational waves? How many decades did theorists--including Einstein himself--argue about the reality of gravitational waves?

Apr 24, 2019
Amazing what real science can achieve, compared to the cults supported by some of the knuckle-draggers that infest this site.

Apr 24, 2019
Another Dark Matter Doh-doh!


Well said, Ignorant, Crackpot. Well said.

Apr 24, 2019
The article says, "instruments picked up the signal of electrons in the atom re-arranging to fill in for the two that were absorbed into the nucleus." I'd like to know the details. Presumably one or more photons were emitted?

Apr 24, 2019
I'd like to know the details. Presumably one or more photons were emitted?

You could go to the link at the bottom and buy the article.

Or you could just email the authors (works 100% of the time if you are courteous in your email)

If you're just interested in how the detector works then look for the XENON1T experiment on wikipedia.

Apr 24, 2019
You could go to the link at the bottom and buy the article.
Sci-hub.tw neatly hops the paywall.

Apr 24, 2019
Slight mistake in this article. TWO protons in Xenon 124 are converted to neutrons, not one. That's why two electrons were captured, one for each proton that was converted.

Apr 24, 2019
Recently two papers have been published. The first one deals with the measurement of the speed of rotation of galaxies and, in our view, closes the issue of the existence of dark matter. The second one argues that the expansion of the universe is not accelerating. However, this fact does not answer the question as to what in general is the cause of the universe's expansion and does not address the widespread opinion that 70% of the universe consists of dark energy.
https://www.acade...k_Energy

Apr 24, 2019
Maybe this is not as "rare" at they make it sound. They have 1300kg of Xenon-124, which rough calculations show that it would contain 6.3x10^27 atoms of Xenon. Half life is shown to be 1.8x10^22. So they should be seeing multiples of these events.

Apr 24, 2019
Maybe this is not as "rare" at they make it sound. They have 1300kg of Xenon-124, which rough calculations show that it would contain 6.3x10^27 atoms of Xenon. Half life is shown to be 1.8x10^22. So they should be seeing multiples of these events.

...per year.

Apr 24, 2019
Awesome experimental observations. I wonder if they'll start calling dark matter the Aether again.

Apr 24, 2019
"A process that takes more than 1 trillion times longer than the age of the universe."

I don't get it.

The universe is full of (dark)matter older than itself? Wouldn't that imply that our universe is either a tiny part of a bigger one or that there are a bunch of universes?

lol I'm very confused

Apr 24, 2019
gculpex, yes correct.
Again, rough calculations, but this would come out to ~600 events per DAY.


Apr 24, 2019
If Wikipedia is right and up to date, this is only the third double electron capture event ever seen, and the first ever seen in xenon. https://en.wikipe..._capture


Apr 24, 2019
Ih, yes. Ut is si fascinating to observe the looneyticks exploring the Universe by sticking tinkertoys up their nostrils.

Then complaining because Real Scientists refuse to take their methodology siriuslee!

Apr 24, 2019
Gorilla, honest questions deserved polite answers, so here you go.

First, the xenon decay occurred in a detector searching for dark matter signals, but the detection of the xenon double-electron capture was not one of those signals. Okay? It was a normal matter interaction.

Second, a xenon double-electron-capture is a rare event. But the odds of noticing an event increase as you add xenon atoms. The detector has a *lot* of xenon atoms in it.

It's the same with dice rolls. Your chance of rolling 20 on a twenty-sided dice is 1 in 20, but if you roll it millions of times, you'll detect lots of twenties. Or try this: as the number of Teslas increase on today's roads, your odds of detecting one go up.

Apr 24, 2019
Gorilla, continuing:

It's not possible to say with authority that dark matter is older than the universe, since we don't know what it is or what its characteristics are.

In fact, it's not even clear that it's matter.

The most accurate name for it is 'dark gravity' - gravitational effects which are unexplained.

Don't fall prey to the temptation to reason about multiple universes from what is known about dark matter, *because nothing is known about dark matter* except for unexplained gravitational effects. We don't know enough about dark matter to prove anything about anything - except for one thing.

Dark matter proves that our understanding of physics is incomplete. That's it.

Apr 24, 2019
Maybe this is not as "rare" at they make it sound. They have 1300kg of Xenon-124, which rough calculations show that it would contain 6.3x10^27 atoms of Xenon. Half life is shown to be 1.8x10^22. So they should be seeing multiples of these events.
Try again... The vat contain 1300kg of pure xenon. Xenon 124 is the the only isotope that have this kind of decay (double electron capture). Pure xenon only contains 0.095% xenon 124.

To declare that you observed the xe124 decay means that they could isolate a 5 sigma signal of it in a very dominant xe126 scintillating environment.

Apr 24, 2019
Dark matter proves that our understanding of physics is incomplete.


I agree. Big words, little understanding, and lots of hubris.

Apr 25, 2019
"Detector observes the rarest event ever recorded" Yes it would be rare considering the doubt about Dark matters existence?

Apr 25, 2019
TechnoCreed, I stand to be corrected. So my number should be about 1/1000 of what I said.
That means less than 1 event per day. And so while rare, still not extremely rare.


Apr 25, 2019
At least the hardware is getting some use.

Apr 25, 2019
"they have observed the radioactive decay of xenon-124, which has a half-life of 1.8 X 1022 years."

Made me wonder what the current constraint is on not having observed proton decay. Which - I believe "natural" - GUT theories predict [ https://en.wikipe...on_decay ]:

"Despite significant experimental effort, proton decay has never been observed. If it does decay via a positron, the proton's half-life is constrained to be at least 1.67×1034 years.[2]"

Apr 25, 2019
"Detector observes the rarest event ever recorded" Yes it would be rare considering the doubt about Dark matters existence?


Did you read *nothing* of the article, the paper *or* this very thread? The observation was of normal matter, concerning normal matter behavior and explained by normal matter behavior.

Here is how it came about:

""It gets tricky, because while we have the science we're trying to do, we also have to think about what else we can do with the experiment," Tunnell says. "We have a lot of students looking for thesis projects, so we make a list of 10 or 20 other measurements—but they're a shot in the dark, and we almost always come up with nothing, as is typical of curiosity-driven science.

"In this case, we took a shot in the dark where two or three students were very lucky.""

https://www.futur...45552-2/


Apr 25, 2019
Too late to edit now, but my first comment should obviously have 10^22 vs 10^34 years. Sorry about not reading it back sooner.

Apr 25, 2019
You were right the first time, @torbjorn. It's 10^34 years according to current experimental investigation.

Apr 25, 2019
"A process that takes more than 1 trillion times longer than the age of the universe."

I don't get it.

The universe is full of (dark)matter older than itself? Wouldn't that imply that our universe is either a tiny part of a bigger one or that there are a bunch of universes?


Urgelt commented nicely on this, but I would like to add that they look at decay processes that will half the mass of the observed isotope at some very distant future time, while the age of most matter derives from that it was created at the Hot Big Bang of the local universe. The preceding inflation era was likely just containing a very high potential energy inflation field, and due to its rapid expansion it was cold and dilute on its own particles and fluctuations (which imprints as the primordial fluctuation source that Planck and other observatories sees the traces of in the cosmic background and cosmic filaments).

Some modern matter sources and sinks are matter/antimatter pair creation/destruction.

Apr 25, 2019
Oh, I should add that the inflation field particles should have been massive and so quickly decay at the Hot Big Bang when their field vanish and help "fuel" the creation of energetic (hot) particles of lower potential energy fields such as dark matter and normal matter. We don't expect to see them I think (but they would likely be very dilute anyway).

The 3d data release of Planck last year was shoring up the consistency and robustness of that picture, since they could observe a so called "slow roll" inflation (so likely a simple single field) and "natural exit" (so likely the field and its particles vanish, and the lower energy particle fields as well as today's lower vacuum energy density appears).

Apr 25, 2019
They can detect that incredibly rare signal, but no sign of dark matter. It rather suggests this is not a good approach for detecting it

Apr 25, 2019
So you think they should stop trying.

OK.

Sounds stupid to me, they didn't stop trying to find the Higgs, but whatever. You're welcome to believe whatever you want, no matter how stupid it is.

Apr 25, 2019
Dark matter does not need electrons outside the nucleus to maintain its symmetrical balance, only a kernel with super-stable anti-energy .

Apr 25, 2019
Quote from article: "The evidence for xenon decay was produced as a proton inside the nucleus of a xenon atom converted into a neutron. In most elements subject to decay, that happens when one electron is pulled into the nucleus. But a proton in a xenon atom must absorb two electrons to convert into a neutron, an event called "double-electron capture."

This puzzles me, I thought charge was conserved is the decay process, what am I missing? Or should It be stating that "two proton convert into two neutrons?

Apr 25, 2019
A few error have been made in the above article creating some confusion. You can find a better article on the subject here:
http://www.xenon1t.org/

Apr 25, 2019
Bill, you're correct. A single neutron can't absorb more than a single electron, and a proton can't have a double positive charge.

What a double-electron absorption event represents is two neutrons in the atom absorbing two electrons simultaneously (or nearly simultaneously), with the associated emission of two neutrinos. The atom's element changes, but its atomic weight remains almost the same, minus the energy carried away by the neutrinos.

The neutrinos, of course, are not at all likely to be caught in a detector. And in any event, this experiment wasn't set up to try to detect neutrinos.

The way the experiment detects a double-neutrino capture is by watching what happens in the electron shell. When two inner electrons are captured, a mad scramble happens in the shell to fill lower electron orbits that were suddenly vacated by the capture event. As higher-energy electrons fall into lower orbits, x-ray photons are emitted. Those are easy to detect.

Apr 25, 2019
Modern Science is not finished.
Those wishing the process to cease & desist at whatever prior level they are comfortable with?
Are constantly being disappointed.

Instead of considering this an interesting challenge to at least try to keep up with scientific process?
Freezing their own thinking into obsolete beliefs.

Yes, Science is not complete & under pressure for constant reviews, revisions & corrections.
A lot of people are unwilling to accept the fact they need to adapt their belief systems to the ever-changing revelations of previously unknown knowledge.

Consider this. New Science equals new technology
If obsolete opinions fail to produce working machinery?
Those cherished beliefs are false.

For all of NP/LT/SR/GR/QM/Gravity being
"incomplete","unresolved", "correctable", "unpredictable".
These Sciences do produce working technology.
Which none of the competing claims have been able to invent anything.

Nuclear bombs work.
Protoplasm bombs do not work.

Apr 25, 2019
Dark matter is a scam and this is just more fake science!

Apr 25, 2019
well rod, I would say you are not real & that you are a fake person.

& I am presenting the exact same quality of evidence as your bogus accusation.

Apr 25, 2019
well rod, I would say you are not real & that you are a fake person.

& I am presenting the exact same quality of evidence as your bogus accusation.


Well said @rrwillsj

Apr 25, 2019
You have to love snakeoil science....

Apr 25, 2019
Physics can't even define normal matter much less be able to define dark matter and if you can't even define it, any detectors you build are pure hokum! This isn't science, it's just internet disinformation!

Apr 25, 2019
well rod, can your snakeoiled pseudo-science produce any working technology?

No. tour ouiija board does not count.

Apr 25, 2019
@torbjorn, many who work on inflation assert that our universe was formed initially with a very different cosmological constant than it has now; this value of the CC was, however, unstable, and underwent vacuum decay, changing its value and incidentally dumping all the energy into the universe, creating the Big Bang.

Since, if this is correct, it's CC and not some other unknown field, the implication is that it's gravitons, not heavy particles, and we have never detected a graviton.

Apr 25, 2019
well rod, can your snakeoiled pseudo-science produce any working technology?

No. tour ouiija board does not count.


well rrw..., Newtonian Physics has been around since long before dark matter and it works very well for everything...
Thank you!

Apr 26, 2019
well rod, can your snakeoiled pseudo-science produce any working technology?

No. tour ouiija board does not count.


well rrw..., Newtonian Physics has been around since long before dark matter and it works very well for everything...

@rodkeh No it does not work for everything, where have you been for the last 100 years, let me guess in church?
Thank you!

Apr 26, 2019
Now chapeaux
You are not being fair!
You should not insult
artistic examples of
architectural science
& skilled craftsmanship.

For being occupied by idiots.

We have to keep the monkeys somewhere?
& the zoos are filled up with wooprimates.

Apr 26, 2019
@rrwillsj

Yup

Apr 26, 2019
oh. i keep forgetting....

"Einstein Cross"

& while i'm here?

Here's hoping, that the crime syndicate
inhabiting the White House
will soon have the experience of inhabiting cages.
Wearing bright orange chumpsuits.

After all, if it's good enough for children?
It's good enough for that lot!

Apr 26, 2019
Doesn't it have to detect dark matter in order to be a dark matter detector?
Calling it a "Dark matter detector" is click bait.
I have a dark matter detector in the medicine cabinet... it takes my temperature. It's above the anti-gravity machine that makes my coffee

Apr 27, 2019
@rodkeh No it does not work for everything, where have you been for the last 100 years, let me guess in church?
Thank you!

Yes it does if you actually understand it. It is part and parcel of the quantum nature of the universe which proves Relativity is a joke!


Apr 27, 2019
DARK MATTER DETECTOR OBSERVES RAREST EVENT EVER RECORDED

Now, if they can only tune it to detect, the never-will-happen event.

Apr 27, 2019
I'd have guessed that you goofs would approve of any effort to detect DM?

In the hopes that failure would result in your superstitious beliefs finally becoming acceptable to intelligent people.

Just no gratitude from you stupes.

Apr 27, 2019
Calling it a "Dark matter detector" is click bait.
I have a dark matter detector in the medicine cabinet... it takes my temperature.

Sooo.. a measuring device is not supposed to be called that until you use it and it gives back a result?

That's a novel 'concept'.

Apr 27, 2019
A steel rule measures the space between two walls

As KP
MrKP> Doesn't it have to detect dark matter in order to be a dark matter detector?
Calling it a "Dark matter detector" is click bait.
I have a dark matter detector in the medicine cabinet... it takes my temperature. It's above the anti-gravity machine that makes my coffee

KP, whether salty of plain
this steel rule can equaly measure the darkmatter between these two walls
as it could
KP, measure the darkmatter between two peanuts
even
KP Peanuts, nice and salty Mr KP old chap!

Apr 27, 2019
Yes it does if you actually understand it. It is part and parcel of the quantum nature of the universe which proves Relativity is a joke!


Clown. Where has relativity been shown to be wrong? Links, please.


Apr 27, 2019
well rrw..., Newtonian Physics has been around since long before dark matter and it works very well for everything...
Thank you!


No it doesn't. Such as the precession of Mercury. And gravitational redshift . And your GPS.

Apr 27, 2019
well rod. based on your criteria of ignorance as the be all & end all of knowledge?

Why call it Newtonian Physics?
He was after all, a member of a small, old boys club/cult of aristocratic bureaucrats.

A lowborn peasant oaf such as you Rod, would never had been granted entrance.
Even through the backdoor, without a chamberpot in your grubby hands.

The list of contemporaries Newton worked & corresponded with?
All had some measure of claim to contributing towards the monumental Principia.

I opinionate that Émilie du Châtelet has as much claim to being designated as an important contributor & editor & equally important, publicist for the Principia.
She brought physics as a modern science to popular notice. internationally.

She corrected his mathematical errors & translated Newton's turgid latin into colloquial French. Which was the cosmopolitan language of all knowledgeable peoples at that time.

Rod, your opinions on these subjects are worthless rubbish!

Apr 27, 2019
well rod. based on your criteria of ignorance as the be all & end all of knowledge?

Why call it Newtonian Physics?
He was after all, a member of a small, old boys club/cult of aristocratic bureaucrats.

A lowborn peasant oaf such as you Rod, would never had been granted entrance.
Even through the backdoor, without a chamberpot in your grubby hands.

The list of contemporaries Newton worked & corresponded with?
All had some measure of claim to contributing towards the monumental Principia.
Rod, your opinions on these subjects are worthless rubbish!
says rrwillsj

rrwillsj, you are not making any sense as usual. Your third-grader English syntax is difficult to comprehend, such as when you say, and I quote:
"The list of contemporaries Newton worked & corresponded with?" Is that a query that you are asking of rodkeh? As well as:
"well rod. based on your criteria of ignorance as the be all & end all of knowledge??
IOW, why do you disconnect your sentences?

Apr 27, 2019
Perhaps rrwillsj is not quite aware of the importance of proper punctuation in text and her strange placement of 'question marks' where there shouldn't be any when the next word's first letter is a Capital letter that would ordinarily indicate that a NEW sentence has begun, but is, in reality, a continuation of the previous sentence where she had placed a 'question mark' as though it were a query but isn't.
I have mentioned this strange quirk of hers before, but rrwillsj has ignored it and continues to punctuate in the wrong place as though she has no memory of it being mentioned to her.
This is very strange behaviour on her part where, perhaps she is not even aware of or concerned about her carelessly typed speech patterns. Most folks would be embarrassed by it being mentioned once, and would strive to IMPROVE their English syntax. But rrwillsj seems very unconcerned and unproductively continues to make the same mistake tyme after tyme. Perhaps she was raised to do that.

Apr 27, 2019
Calling it a "Dark matter detector" is click bait.
I have a dark matter detector in the medicine cabinet... it takes my temperature.

Sooo.. a measuring device is not supposed to be called that until you use it and it gives back a result?

That's a novel 'concept'.


Is it a dark matter detector? No.
Did it detect the rarest event ever recorded? No.


Apr 28, 2019
Is it a dark matter detector? No.

Yes it is. It is specifically set up to look for the signature of a specific (as yet just hypothetical) type of dark matter.
Did it detect the rarest event ever recorded? No.

Which recorded event was rarer?

Apr 28, 2019
Nutjobs always deny data. Otherwise they'd have to admit they're nutjobs.

Apr 28, 2019
oohhh! Look down into the pit I had dug for rodkeh!
Caught me a sillyeffhead instead.
Look at it tantrum with infantile zeal as we gather around laughing at the dweeb.

What a sucker! So gullible. Gotta wonder how many times the sillyegghead has paid cash upfront to purchase magic beans?

Apr 28, 2019
Clown. Where has relativity been shown to be wrong? Links, please.


Why?

Apr 28, 2019
Rod, your opinions on these subjects are worthless rubbish!


You really have nothing of any value to contribute!

Apr 28, 2019
No it doesn't. Such as the precession of Mercury. And gravitational redshift . And your GPS.


There is no such thing as, "gravitational redshift"......

Apr 28, 2019
Oh, Really?
& yet you rely on GR based GPS to communicate your lunacy to the Internet.

Or that's a really super-duper ouiija board you use to send us your spirit messages.

Or, you rodkeh,
are a super-hypocrite,
using GR based technology
to deny that such technology can exist.

I mean you'd have to be pretty feeble-minded,
driving a car down a read, running over people.
& then denying the existence of the internal combustion engine...

Do you really mean to contradict your own fakir pseudo-science?
While attempting to to deny Modern Science?

Apr 28, 2019
Oh, Really?
?

Einstein was a shmuck and GR is a joke.

Apr 28, 2019
Works pretty good for being a joke. Nobody's found anything wrong with it in a hundred years.

You claiming you have?

Apr 29, 2019
Using a known atomic particle to find DM is silly
Agree with you SEU
They should use Time Negation instead

Apr 29, 2019
Oh, Really?
?

Einstein was a shmuck and GR is a joke.


I was wondering when the white supremacist would get around to antisemitism. OK @rodkeh you are an asshole.

Apr 29, 2019
No it doesn't. Such as the precession of Mercury. And gravitational redshift . And your GPS.


There is no such thing as, "gravitational redshift"......


Yes there is. thicko. And it has been detected, just as predicted, in measurements of star S2 around Sgr A*;

Detection of the gravitational redshift in the orbit of the star S2 near the Galactic centre massive blackhole
https://ore.exete...llowed=y

You aren't one of these electric universe idiots, are you?

Apr 29, 2019
You aren't one of these electric universe idiots, are you?


No... And I'm not one of those so uneducated, that I believe any idiotic nonsense. Just because some idiot can imagine something, doesn't make it true!

Apr 29, 2019
. OK @rodkeh you are an asshole.


And you hat... are an idiot!

Apr 30, 2019
And I'm not one of those so uneducated, that I believe any idiotic nonsense.

Then you're doing your damndest to fool us all.

Apr 30, 2019
You aren't one of these electric universe idiots, are you?


No... And I'm not one of those so uneducated, that I believe any idiotic nonsense. Just because some idiot can imagine something, doesn't make it true!


So, deal with the observation of gravitational redshift that I linked. Scientifically.

Apr 30, 2019
And I'm not one of those so uneducated, that I believe any idiotic nonsense.

Then you're doing your damndest to fool us all.


You gave me a sensible chuckle.

Apr 30, 2019
No it doesn't. Such as the precession of Mercury. And gravitational redshift . And your GPS.


There is no such thing as, "gravitational redshift"......


You aren't one of these electric universe idiots, are you?

Gravitational redshift https://phys.org/...nwletter
"Gravitational redshift occurs because intense gravity on the star's surface slows the vibration of light waves, stretching them and making the star appear redder than normal from Earth."

Apr 30, 2019
And I'm not one of those so uneducated, that I believe any idiotic nonsense.

Then you're doing your damndest to fool us all.


That obviously doesn't take much....

Apr 30, 2019
You aren't one of these electric universe idiots, are you?


No... And I'm not one of those so uneducated, that I believe any idiotic nonsense. Just because some idiot can imagine something, doesn't make it true!


So, deal with the observation of gravitational redshift that I linked. Scientifically.


Pure nonsense if you understand subatomic structure.

May 03, 2019

Pure nonsense if you understand subatomic structure.


@rodkeh
Ok.
Could you please elaborate this further ?


May 04, 2019

Pure nonsense if you understand subatomic structure.


@rodkeh
Ok.
Could you please elaborate this further ?

Do you really think you can learn Physics on the internet?


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