How will addressing climate change affect the job market?

December 5, 2018, Wiley
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

The Paris Agreement's goal to keep global warming below 2°C can be achieved by increasing the use of renewable energy and improving energy efficiency. A new International Labour Review study explores the impact of such transitions on employment.

The study finds that by 2030, most countries will experience net job creation and reallocation across industries. Job creation will be driven by the construction, manufacturing, and renewables sectors.

"Climate action is an opportunity to create over 24 million across the world. To maximise the employment opportunities, governments need to complement climate action with a conducive legal framework, consultation process of society, social protection, skills and industrial policy to enable a just transition," said lead author Guillermo Montt, of the International Labour Office, a specialised agency of the United Nations dealing with labour issues. "In this context, job losses should not be an excuse to slow down urgent ."

Explore further: Green jobs debate should look beyond short-term benefits, says UKERC report

More information: Guillermo MONTT et al, Does climate action destroy jobs? An assessment of the employment implications of the 2-degree goal, International Labour Review (2018). DOI: 10.1111/ilr.12118

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