Chemicals linked to endocrine disorder in older pet cats

September 19, 2018, Wiley
New research suggests that there may be a link between higher levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the environment and higher levels of hyperthyroidism in pet cats as they age Credit: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

New research suggests that there may be a link between higher levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the environment and higher levels of hyperthyroidism in pet cats as they age. The findings are published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

PFAS are a family of more than 3,000 structures of highly fluorinated chemicals used in industrial processes and consumer products, such as protective coatings for carpets, furniture and apparel, paper coatings, insecticide formulations, and other items.

The study involved analyses of blood samples from older cats in Northern California. Investigators examined the animals' exposures to PFAS and compared PFAS levels between cats with and without hyperthyroidism, a very common endocrine disorder in senior cats. ?

"Our lab has been investigating PFAS for years. Cats can be good sentinels to examine body burdens of emerging pollutants, including PFAS," said lead author Dr. Miaomiao Wang, of the California Environmental Protection Agency. "The current study is only preliminary, however, and larger scale studies might be helpful to confirm our findings."

Explore further: Certain environmental pollutants may contribute to poor kidney health

More information: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (2018). DOI: 10.1002/etc.4239

Related Stories

Congress wants EPA to more quickly regulate unsafe chemicals

September 6, 2018

Republican and Democratic lawmakers pressed the Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday to act faster to bring more of the country's most hazardous industrial chemicals and substances under tighter regulation, saying ...

High levels of chemicals found in indoor cats

February 24, 2017

A study from Stockholm University have now established what was previously suspected, that the high levels of brominated flame retardants measured in cats are from the dust in our homes. The study has been published in the ...

Recommended for you

Study shows city rats eat better than country rats

October 17, 2018

A pair of researchers, one with Trent University in Canada, the other the University of Manchester in the U.K. has found evidence that rats living in cities have a much richer diet than rats living in the country. In their ...

A curious branch of plankton evolution

October 17, 2018

Planktonic foraminifera (forams) - tiny, shelled organisms that float in the sea—left behind one of the most complete fossil records of evolutionary history in deep sea deposits. Consequently, evolutionists have a relatively ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.