Chemicals linked to endocrine disorder in older pet cats

September 19, 2018, Wiley
New research suggests that there may be a link between higher levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the environment and higher levels of hyperthyroidism in pet cats as they age Credit: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

New research suggests that there may be a link between higher levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the environment and higher levels of hyperthyroidism in pet cats as they age. The findings are published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

PFAS are a family of more than 3,000 structures of highly fluorinated chemicals used in industrial processes and consumer products, such as protective coatings for carpets, furniture and apparel, paper coatings, insecticide formulations, and other items.

The study involved analyses of blood samples from older cats in Northern California. Investigators examined the animals' exposures to PFAS and compared PFAS levels between cats with and without hyperthyroidism, a very common endocrine disorder in senior cats. ?

"Our lab has been investigating PFAS for years. Cats can be good sentinels to examine body burdens of emerging pollutants, including PFAS," said lead author Dr. Miaomiao Wang, of the California Environmental Protection Agency. "The current study is only preliminary, however, and larger scale studies might be helpful to confirm our findings."

Explore further: Certain environmental pollutants may contribute to poor kidney health

More information: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (2018). DOI: 10.1002/etc.4239

Related Stories

Congress wants EPA to more quickly regulate unsafe chemicals

September 6, 2018

Republican and Democratic lawmakers pressed the Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday to act faster to bring more of the country's most hazardous industrial chemicals and substances under tighter regulation, saying ...

High levels of chemicals found in indoor cats

February 24, 2017

A study from Stockholm University have now established what was previously suspected, that the high levels of brominated flame retardants measured in cats are from the dust in our homes. The study has been published in the ...

Recommended for you

After a reset, Сuriosity is operating normally

February 23, 2019

NASA's Curiosity rover is busy making new discoveries on Mars. The rover has been climbing Mount Sharp since 2014 and recently reached a clay region that may offer new clues about the ancient Martian environment's potential ...

Study: With Twitter, race of the messenger matters

February 23, 2019

When NFL player Colin Kaepernick took a knee during the national anthem to protest police brutality and racial injustice, the ensuing debate took traditional and social media by storm. University of Kansas researchers have ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.