Quantum radar will expose stealth aircraft

April 23, 2018 by Christine Bezruki, University of Waterloo
Credit: University of Waterloo

Stealth aircraft in the Canadian arctic will be no match for a new quantum radar system.

Researchers at the University of Waterloo are developing a new technology that promises to help radar operators cut through heavy background noise and isolate objects—including stealth aircraft and missiles—with unparalleled accuracy.

"In the Arctic, space weather such as geomagnetic storms and solar flares interfere with radar operation and make the effective identification of objects more challenging," said Jonathan Baugh, a faculty member at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) and a professor in the Department of Chemistry who is leading the project with three other researchers at IQC and the Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology (WIN). "By moving from traditional radar to quantum radar, we hope to not only cut through this noise, but also to identify objects that have been specifically designed to avoid detection."

Stealth aircraft rely on special paint and body design to absorb and deflect radio waves—making them invisible to traditional radar. They also use electronic jamming to swamp detectors with artificial noise. With quantum radar, in theory, these planes will not only be exposed, but also unaware they have been detected.

Technology to improve national defence

Quantum radar uses a sensing technique called quantum illumination to detect and receive information about an object. At its core, it leverages the quantum principle of entanglement, where two photons form a connected, or entangled, pair.

The method works by sending one of the photons to a distant , while retaining the other member of the pair. Photons in the return signal are checked for telltale signatures of entanglement, allowing photons from the noisy environmental background to be discarded. This can greatly improve the radar signal-to-noise in certain situations.

But in order for quantum radar to work in the field, researchers first need to realize a fast, on-demand source of entangled photons.

"The goal for our project is to create a robust source of that can be generated at the press of a button," said Baugh.

To date, quantum illumination has only been explored in the laboratory. The Government of Canada, under the Department of National Defence's All Domain Situational Awareness (ADSA) Science & Technology program, is investing $2.7 million to expedite its use in the field.

The 54 North Warning System (NWS) radar stations, based in the Arctic and operated by the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), are nearing the end of their life spans and could need to be replaced as early as 2025.

"This project will allow us to develop the technology to help move from the lab to the field," said Baugh. "It could change the way we think about national security."

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rrwillsj
1 / 5 (1) Apr 25, 2018
If they get this working. Reliably and continuously?
Quantum Radar would be an enormous boost for increasing the safety margins for spacecraft.

The macroscopic debris insystem is traveling at great speed and from a multitude of directions. Even fine sand or grit can be lethal at tens of thousands of kilometers an hour.
Da Schneib
1 / 5 (1) Apr 25, 2018
It's an interesting idea, but an obvious problem is that entangled photons are no longer entangled after they've interacted with the environment. In other words, when used as radar, when they bounce off of the target, they are decohered.

Another point about this is that since there are only a small number of parameters on which photons can be entangled, and large numbers of photons are received at all times, the possibility for false detections is quite high.

And yet a third problem is that stealth planes are designed to reflect radar beams away from the source, rather than returning them to it, by their shape. In addition, radar-absorbing paint also prevents the signal from being returned. In both these cases merely tagging the photons with entanglement won't help, since the receiver will never see them.

This sounds like someone who doesn't quite understand either stealth or entanglement having an imagination attack. Either that or a boondoggle.
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Apr 25, 2018
Die Scheide informiert
It's an interesting idea, but an obvious problem is that... Another point about this is that... And yet a third problem is that...
? This guy actually thinks he knows something that

"Researchers at the University of Waterloo"

who

"are developing a new technology that promises to help radar operators cut through heavy background noise and isolate objects—including stealth aircraft and missiles—with unparalleled accuracy"

and for whom

"The Government of Canada, under the Department of National Defence's All Domain Situational Awareness (ADSA) Science & Technology program, is investing $2.7 million to expedite its use"

-have missed after months of research and years of education.

Hey muschimanm why dont you save canada lots of money and give those experts a call? After all, you can read a pr news release and instantly know more about the subject than they do.

Im sure they could use a laugh.

Im laughing at the moment actually.
Da Schneib
1 / 5 (1) Apr 25, 2018
@Goo obviously doesn't know enough to comment.

Being as how it didn't, in fact, comment.

Teh stupid, it burnz.

If you're going to try to masquerade as knowledgeable, @Goo, perhaps you should actually answer some of the technical arguments instead of blindly trolling. Lest you be revealed as a mere troll.

Just sayin'.
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Apr 26, 2018
@Goo obviously doesn't know enough to comment
All I gots to know little Muschi is that you read one pr article and feel qualified to criticise scientists who have spent months on the project, and have earned millions to pursue it.

And you don't just ask insinuating questions, you state categorically that
This sounds like someone who doesn't quite understand either stealth or entanglement having an imagination attack
I'm sorry. But i know deranged when I see it.
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Apr 26, 2018
Seriously - if you really want to find out the extent of your disconnect, send them an email. Describe your consternation. I'm sure they will be very polite, and you will have learned a great deal about yourself.

After all we are here to learn aren't we?

Here let me help

Jonathan Baugh
Faculty, Associate Professor
Email: baugh@uwaterloo.ca
http://info.iqc.ca/csg/

"Prior to joining IQC and the Department of Chemistry in 2007, he spent one year as a Visiting Researcher at the University of Tokyo. He was previously a Post-Doctoral Fellow at IQC, and received a PhD in Physics in 2001 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill."
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Apr 26, 2018
He might be very happy to know that he
doesn't quite understand either stealth or entanglement having an imagination attack
-He might even offer to give you as tour and a collab-

You might even save his entire career!! ahaahaaa

You must at least be curious as to how he could have gotten all those degrees and positions without understanding
either stealth or entanglement having an imagination attack
-I mean, a real mystery there, wot?
Da Schneib
1 / 5 (1) Apr 26, 2018
@Goo, if you're going to bloviate about radar, stealth, and entanglement, it would help if you understood at least one of them. Kinda like knowing what "polywell" means before you start talking about polywells.

You had your chance to be civil. You won't get another for a long, long time. Try not being a flaming, gaping, flapping, stinking asshole.
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Apr 26, 2018
@Goo, if you're going to bloviate about radar, stealth, and entanglement, it would help if you understood at least one of them. Kinda like knowing what "polywell" means before you start talking about polywells
Scheide doesn't realize that his comments are still directed at the real scientists who did the study, not me.
Kinda like knowing what "polywell" means before you start talking about polywells
Again, it was thge inventors own def of polywell that you couldn't accept. But that was because you revealed you didnt know the difference between polywell and fusor.

Can't hide THAT much stupid.

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