NASA tracking Atlantic's Tropical storm Rina

November 7, 2017, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
On Nov. 6, a visible image of Tropical Storm Rina was acquired from the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite. Credit: NOAA/NASA Rapid Response Team

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite has been providing forecasters with imagery of Tropical Storm Rina as it moves north through the Central Atlantic Ocean.

Tropical Depression 19 strengthened into a tropical and was renamed Rina at 10 p.m. EST on Nov. 6.

On Nov. 6 the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a of the storm as it was strengthening to tropical storm status. The image showed that Rina's overall cloud pattern increased in coverage in the eastern quadrant of the storm. There also appeared to be with a little more deep convection having developed near the low-level center of circulation. The image was created at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

By 4 a.m. EST (5 a.m. AST) on Tuesday, Nov. 7 the center of Tropical Storm Rina was located near 31.4 degrees north latitude and 49.8 degrees west longitude. That's about 1,370 miles (2,200 km) west-southwest of the Azores islands. Rina was moving toward the north near 12 mph (19 kph). This general motion accompanied by an increase in forward speed is expected through today. A turn toward north-northeast is forecast to occur by Wednesday night, Nov. 8.

Maximum sustained winds are near 40 mph (65 kph) with higher gusts. Some strengthening is forecast during the next 48 hours. The estimated minimum central pressure of 1009 millibars is based on recent reports from a nearby buoy.

NHC forecaster Stewart noted "the cyclone should continue to accelerate toward the north today and then toward the north-northeast on Wednesday. By 48 hours, Rina is expected to get caught up in the mid-latitude westerlies and accelerate even more toward the northeast over the cold waters of the north Atlantic.

Explore further: NASA sees late season Atlantic Tropical Depression form

Related Stories

NASA sees late season Atlantic Tropical Depression form

November 6, 2017

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Depression Nineteen shortly after it formed in the Central Atlantic Ocean on Nov. 6. A visible image from Terra showed the storm formed despite being under wind shear conditions.

NASA eyes the Development of Tropical Storm Ophelia

October 10, 2017

Tropical Storm Ophelia developed on Oct. 9 around 5 a.m. EDT as the seventeenth, tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season. It formed in the Central Atlantic Ocean about 875 miles (1,405 km) west-southwest ...

NASA-NOAA's satellite night-time nod to Norma

September 15, 2017

Infrared imagery provides a look at tropical cyclones at night and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite got a look at Tropical Storm Norma in the Eastern Pacific using infrared light.

NASA-NOAA Satellite spots 2 tails of Hurricane Max

September 14, 2017

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the latest tropical cyclone in the Eastern Pacific on Sept. 13 along the southwestern coast of Mexico. After Max formed as a tropical storm, it appeared to have two "tails." ...

NASA watching Tropical Storm Jose get organized

September 6, 2017

Tropical Storm Jose appeared somewhat elongated in NASA satellite imagery as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead, but the storm organized and strengthened overnight.

Recommended for you

Unprecedented ice loss in Russian ice cap

September 19, 2018

In the last few years, the Vavilov Ice Cap in the Russian High Arctic has dramatically accelerated, sliding as much as 82 feet a day in 2015, according to a new multi-national, multi-institute study led by CIRES Fellow Mike ...

Diverse forests are stronger against drought

September 19, 2018

Diversity is strength, even among forests. In a paper published in Nature, researchers led by University of Utah biologist William Anderegg report that forests with trees that employ a high diversity of traits related to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.