NASA sees late season Atlantic Tropical Depression form

November 6, 2017, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Depression 19 early on Nov. 6. The image showed the bulk of clouds and thunderstorms in the eastern and southern quadrants of the storm. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Depression Nineteen shortly after it formed in the Central Atlantic Ocean on Nov. 6. A visible image from Terra showed the storm formed despite being under wind shear conditions.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami noted that the depression is no threat to land and is expected to become a .

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite provided a of Tropical Depression 19 early on Nov. 6. The image showed the bulk of clouds and thunderstorms in the eastern and southern quadrants of the storm. The National Hurricane Center noted "The depression has a sheared appearance with the low-level center exposed to the west of the mid-level center and the convective bands."

At 11 a.m. AST (10 a.m. EST/1500 UTC) the center of Tropical Depression Nineteen was located near 29.5 degrees north latitude and 50.4 degrees west longitude. That's about 1,460 miles (2,350 km) west southwest of the Azores Islands. The depression was moving toward the north-northeast near 3 mph (6 kph). A significantly faster north to north-northeast motion is expected during the next couple of days.

Maximum sustained winds are near 35 mph (55 kph) with higher gusts. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1013 millibars. .

Slow strengthening is expected during the next 48 hours, and the depression could become a tropical storm later in the day on Monday, November 6, 2017. Hurricane Season in the Atlantic ends officially on Nov. 30.

For updated forecasts on Tropical Depression 19, visit: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

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