NASA launches next-generation weather satellite

November 18, 2017
The Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) lifts off on a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base
The Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) lifts off on a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, at 1:47 a.m. PST on November 18, 2017

NASA on Saturday launched a next-generation satellite into space designed to monitor weather around the world and help improve forecasts.

The , called the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1), is a joint venture between the US and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which provides weather reports and forecasts.

The satellite was launched aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket as scheduled at 1:47 am (0947 GMT) from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

It will orbit the Earth 14 times each day from one pole to the other at 512 miles (824 kilometers) above the planet, "providing scientists full global coverage twice a day," NASA said.

The satellite "is the first in NOAA's series of four, next-generation operational environmental satellites representing major advancements in observations used for severe weather prediction and environmental monitoring," it said.

JPSS-1 "carries a suite of advanced instruments designed to take global measurements of atmospheric, land and sea conditions, from , volcanic ash, hurricane intensity and many more."

Four smaller satellites called CubeSats, part of NASA's educational nano-satellite program, are to be released on the same mission.

The CubeSats belong to four US universities and will be set in orbit after the weather satellite has been deployed, NASA said.

Two previous launch attempts had been cancelled, once due to high winds and another due to technical problems.

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6 comments

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big_hairy_jimbo
not rated yet Nov 18, 2017
A "weather" satellite launched from an AIR FORCE base, in a POLAR orbit to map the entire globe TWICE daily. Hmmmmmm let me think...... Would make a pretty good SPY satellite.
mackita
5 / 5 (1) Nov 19, 2017
Captain Stumpy
5 / 5 (1) Nov 19, 2017
Would make a pretty good SPY satellite
@jimbo
yes and no

yes and good as in: google maps pretty pictures to see stuff regularly

no and bad as in: everyone knows where and when it will be around
from an AIR FORCE base
irrelevant really
the USAF mission includes space
unrealone1
1 / 5 (2) Nov 19, 2017
Will the data be "adjusted" or "homogenised" ?
big_hairy_jimbo
5 / 5 (1) Nov 20, 2017
@Captain Stumpy well ANY spy satellite can be detected and KNOWN when it will be over head. That's the thing about orbital mechanics.... very predictable. The US has made a habit of publicly announcing spy satellite launches as "weather" satellites. Most countries do. Just WHY does a weather satellite require a launch from an AIR FORCE base???
Captain Stumpy
5 / 5 (1) Nov 20, 2017
Just WHY does a weather satellite require a launch from an AIR FORCE base???
because the USAF mission includes space
The Space and Missile Systems Center at Los Angeles AFB, Calif., designs and acquires all Air Force and most Department of Defense space systems. It oversees launches, completes on-orbit checkouts and then turns systems over to user agencies. It supports the Program Executive Office for Space on the Global Positioning, Defense Satellite Communications and MILSTAR systems. SMC also supports the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle, Defense Meteorological Satellite and Defense Support programs and the Space-Based Infrared System.
Spacelift operations at the East and West Coast launch bases provide services, facilities and range safety control for the conduct of DOD, NASA and commercial launches. ...
http://www.afspc.af.mil

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