California launch of new US weather satellite postponed

November 14, 2017
California launch of new US weather satellite postponed
In this photo from NASA TV, a new type of U.S. weather satellite, intended to improve the accuracy of extended forecasts, sits on a launch pad at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017. A press release from the base said the planned launch was scrubbed early Tuesday because of an unspecified issue and managers didn't have enough time to resolve it. (NASA TV via AP)

Officials have postponed the California launch of a new type of U.S. weather satellite intended to improve the accuracy of extended forecasts.

A press release from Vandenberg Air Force Base says the planned launch was scrubbed early Tuesday because of an unspecified issue and managers didn't have enough time to resolve it.

The launch of the Delta 2 rocket has been rescheduled for Wednesday, at 1:47 a.m. PST.

The rocket will carry the Joint Polar Satellite System-1, the first of four advanced spacecraft for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Operating in polar orbit, the satellite is designed to make global observations that will improve forecasts of severe weather three to seven days out.

Explore further: Classified US spy satellite launched from California

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