Artificially cooling planet 'risky strategy,' new research shows

November 14, 2017
climate
Credit: public domain

Proposals to reduce the effects of global warming by imitating volcanic eruptions could have a devastating effect on global regions prone to either tumultuous storms or prolonged drought, new research has shown.

Geoengineering - the intentional manipulation of the climate to counter the effect of by injecting aerosols artificially into the atmosphere - has been mooted as a potential way to deal with climate change.

However new research led by climate experts from the University of Exeter suggests that targeting geoengineering in one hemisphere could have a severely detrimental impact for the other.

They suggest that while injections of aerosols in the would reduce - responsible for such recent phenomena including Hurricane Katrina - it would at the same time lead to increased likelihood for drought in the Sahel, the area of sub-Saharan Africa just south of the Sahara desert.

In response, the team of researchers have called on policymakers worldwide to strictly regulate any large scale unilateral geoengineering programmes in the future to prevent inducing natural disasters in different parts of the world.

The study is published in leading scientific journal Nature Communications on Tuesday, November 14 2017.

Dr Anthony Jones, A climate science expert from the University of Exeter and lead author on the paper said: "Our results confirm that regional is a highly risky strategy which could simultaneously benefit one region to the detriment of another. It is vital that policymakers take solar geoengineering seriously and act swiftly to install effective regulation."

The innovative research centres on the impact solar geoengineering methods that inject aerosols into the atmosphere may have on the frequency of tropical cyclones.

The controversial approach, known as stratospheric injection, is designed to effectively cool the Earth's surface by reflecting some sunlight before it reaches the surface. The proposals mimic the aftermath of , when aerosols are naturally injected into the atmosphere.

In the study, the researchers use sophisticated simulations with a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean model to investigate the effect of hemispheric stratospheric aerosol on North Atlantic tropical cyclone frequency.

They find injections of aerosols in the northern hemisphere would decrease North Atlantic tropical cyclone frequency, while injections contained to the southern hemisphere may potentially enhance it.

Crucially, the team warn however that while tropical cyclone activity in the North Atlantic could be suppressed by northern hemisphere injections, this would, at the same time, induce droughts in the Sahel.

These results suggest the uncertain effects of solar geoengineering—a proposed approach to counteract global warming—which should be considered by policymakers.

Professor Jim Haywood, from the Mathematics department at the University of Exeter and co-author of the study added: "This research shows how a global temperature target such as 1.5 or 2C needs to be combined with information on a more regional scale to properly assess the full range of climate impacts."

The research, Impacts of hemispheric solar on tropical cyclone frequency, is published in the journal Nature Communications.

Explore further: Modeling strategy allows scientists to explore ways to limit warming, reduce side effects

More information: Anthony C. Jones et al, Impacts of hemispheric solar geoengineering on tropical cyclone frequency, Nature Communications (2017). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01606-0

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dirk_bruere
not rated yet Nov 14, 2017
How about injecting into both hemispheres?
julianpenrod
1 / 5 (4) Nov 14, 2017
Among other things, those who wish to deny chemtrails insist that it is impossible to spread enough chemical to affect the atmosphere. This report treats it as if it is at least all but immediately possible to arrange. And, consider, chemtrailing appears to have been going on since at least the Fifties. Initially, they were invisible. In 1997, the atmosphere appears to have become saturated with chemical so any new contributions precipitated out and that's why they became visible.
julianpenrod
1 / 5 (2) Nov 14, 2017
It should be mentioned that there are a number of other reasons for not engaging in this kind of program to "stop 'global warming'". Among other things, actions like launching huge umbrellas into orbit or creating clouds to reflect sunlight back to space will deprive many people of the well being of a clear sky. Many, for example, have "seasonal affective disorder, so darkness, murk makes them depressed. And it was found that many people react to the light blue of a clear sky by becoming imaginative. The New World Order would appreciate being able to control people's feelings. Also, the techniques mentioned would literally throw away what God is offering, sunlight. To fo that can lead to God punishing man, and, when God acts, He does so in a way that won't be mistaken for the actions of men.
ab3a
3 / 5 (2) Nov 14, 2017
Interesting. We know more than enough to tell everyone how to live their lives and all the risks that entails, but the risks from actually trying to do something active about the problem are considered extreme. Hmmmm.
rrrander
1 / 5 (1) Nov 15, 2017
Michael Crichton's book, "State of Fear" illustrated the lengths (through fiction) that these global warming lunatics might go through to get their way. It was one of the few of Crichton's books not made into a movie, because Hollywood is filled with liberal shills who won't produce anything that goes against their left-wing belief system.
mackita
5 / 5 (1) Nov 15, 2017
the team warn however that while tropical cyclone activity in the North Atlantic could be suppressed by northern hemisphere injections, this would, at the same time, induce droughts in the Sahel

It's not just about cyclones, but about fact, that aerosol work like condensation nuclei for atmospheric humidity, which would precipitate in many but small droplets, unable to rain. This effect is already known from smog above China.
somefingguy
not rated yet Nov 15, 2017
Many, for example, have "seasonal affective disorder, so darkness, murk makes them depressed. And it was found that many people react to the light blue of a clear sky by becoming imaginative. The New World Order would appreciate being able to control people's feelings. Also, the techniques mentioned would literally throw away what God is offering, sunlight. To fo that can lead to God punishing man, and, when God acts, He does so in a way that won't be mistaken for the actions of men.


Why do nutjobs such as yourself even visit scientific websites? I don't get it. You'd think you'd spew your religious and conspiracy theorist bullshit on forums with like minded individuals, so you can all feel better about yourselves when everyone re-affirms your false beliefs.

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