Bushfires on east coast of Australia out of control

An unprecedented number of bushfires have erupted on the east coast of Australia due to hot, dry, windy weather. Smoke billows from the scores of bushfires on Australia east coast in this image captured by NASA's Terra satellite ...

Into the molecular eye: Investigating liquid samples in real time

Biofilms are integral to Earth's ecology and the sustainability of life. Made up of microorganisms, biofilms play vital roles in recycling life's most essential elements. But a lack of versatile analytical tools has made ...

Breaking waves propel ancient molecules into the air

A discovery that helps explain how organic matter produced by life thousands of years ago is ultimately removed from the sea has been published in Science Advances by Steven Beaupré of Stony Brook University's School of ...

How aerosols affect our climate

For many, the word "aerosol" might conjure thoughts of hairspray or spray paint. More accurately, though, aerosols are simply particles found in the atmosphere. They can be human-made, like from car exhaust or biomass burning, ...

Tiny particles lead to brighter clouds in the tropics

When clouds loft tropical air masses higher in the atmosphere, that air can carry up gases that form into tiny particles, starting a process that may end up brightening lower-level clouds, according to a CIRES-led study published ...

page 1 from 23

Aerosol

Technically, an aerosol is a suspension of fine solid particles or liquid droplets in a gas. Examples are clouds, and air pollution such as smog and smoke. In general conversation, aerosol usually refers to an aerosol spray can or the output of such a can. The word aerosol derives from the fact that matter "floating" in air is a suspension (a mixture in which solid or liquid or combined solid–liquid particles are suspended in a fluid). To differentiate suspensions from true solutions, the term sol evolved—originally meant to cover dispersions of tiny (sub-microscopic) particles in a liquid. With studies of dispersions in air, the term aerosol evolved and now embraces both liquid droplets, solid particles, and combinations of these. The Earth atmosphere contains aerosols of various types and concentrations, including quantities of:

By far the most common aerosols in the atmosphere are clouds, which normally consist of suspensions of water droplets or ice particles of greater or lesser density.

Aerosols can be found in urban Ecosystems in various forms, for example:

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA