Advances make reduced graphene oxide electronics feasible

March 30, 2017 by Matt Shipman
Credit: North Carolina State University

Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a technique for converting positively charged (p-type) reduced graphene oxide (rGO) into negatively charged (n-type) rGO, creating a layered material that can be used to develop rGO-based transistors for use in electronic devices.

"Graphene is extremely conductive, but is not a semiconductor; has a bandgap like a semiconductor, but does not conduct well at all – so we created rGO," says Jay Narayan, the John C. Fan Distinguished Chair Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at NC State and corresponding author of a paper describing the work. "But rGO is p-type, and we needed to find a way to make n-type rGO. And now we have it for next-generation, two-dimensional electronic devices."

Specifically, Narayan and Anagh Bhaumik – a Ph.D. student in his lab – demonstrated two things in this study. First, they were able to integrate rGO onto sapphire and silicon wafers – across the entire wafer.

Second, the researchers used high-powered pulses to disrupt chemical groups at regular intervals across the wafer. This disruption moved electrons from one group to another, effectively converting p-type rGO to n-type rGO. The entire process is done at and pressure using high-power nanosecond laser pulses, and is completed in less than one-fifth of a microsecond. The laser radiation annealing provides a high degree of spatial and depth control for creating the n-type regions needed to create p-n junction-based two-dimensional electronic devices.

The end result is a with a layer of n-type rGO on the surface and a layer of p-type rGO underneath.

This is critical, because the p-n junction, where the two types meet, is what makes the material useful for transistor applications.

The paper, "Conversion of p to n-type Reduced Graphene Oxide by Laser Annealing at Room Temperature and Pressure," is published in the Journal of Applied Physics.

Explore further: New technique integrates graphene, graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide onto silicon chips at room temperature

More information: Anagh Bhaumik et al. Conversion oftotype reduced graphene oxide by laser annealing at room temperature and pressure, Journal of Applied Physics (2017). DOI: 10.1063/1.4979211

Related Stories

Engineering dream diodes with a graphene interlayer

February 8, 2017

A team of researchers affiliated with UNIST has created a new technique that greatly enhances the performance of Schottky diodes used in electronic devices. Their research findings have attracted considerable attention within ...

Team engineers oxide semiconductor just single atom thick

February 8, 2017

A new study, affiliated with UNIST has introduced a novel method for fabrication of world's thinnest oxide semiconductor that is just one atom thick. This may open up new possibilities for thin, transparent, and flexible ...

Recommended for you

Engineers create plants that glow

December 13, 2017

Imagine that instead of switching on a lamp when it gets dark, you could read by the light of a glowing plant on your desk.

Faster, more accurate cancer detection using nanoparticles

December 12, 2017

Using light-emitting nanoparticles, Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists have invented a highly effective method to detect tiny tumors and track their spread, potentially leading to earlier cancer detection and more ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.