Related topics: light · laser beam · atoms · wavelength · nature photonics

Exploring the hyperchaos of mid-infrared lasers

Chaos, often popularized as the 'butterfly effect', describes the irregular phenomenon of deterministic systems. Based on the unique features of sensitivity to initial conditions and unpredictability of future evolutions, ...

Minimizing laser phase noise with machine learning

Ultra-precise lasers can be used for optical atomic clocks, quantum computers, power cable monitoring, and much more. But all lasers make noise, which researchers from DTU Fotonik want to minimize using machine learning.

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Laser

A laser is a device that emits light (electromagnetic radiation) through a process called stimulated emission. The term laser is an acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. Laser light is usually spatially coherent, which means that the light either is emitted in a narrow, low-divergence beam, or can be converted into one with the help of optical components such as lenses. Typically, lasers are thought of as emitting light with a narrow wavelength spectrum ("monochromatic" light). This is not true of all lasers, however: some emit light with a broad spectrum, while others emit light at multiple distinct wavelengths simultaneously. The coherence of typical laser emission is distinctive. Most other light sources emit incoherent light, which has a phase that varies randomly with time and position.

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