The Journal of Applied Physics is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published since 1931 by the American Institute of Physics. Its emphasis is on the understanding of the physics underpinning modern technology. The editor-in-chief is P. James Viccaro (University of Chicago). According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 2.064. The journal was initially owned by the American Physical Society and was, for its first seven volumes, known simply as Physics. In January 1937, for its eighth volume, the ownership was then handed over to the American Institute of Physics "in line with the efforts of the American Physical Society to enhance the standing of physics as a profession". The Journal of Applied Physics publishes experimental and theoretical results of research on, amongst other topics, semiconductors, magnetic materials, and applied biophysics. Since January 2005, articles in the Journal of Applied Physics have been published online daily and collected into issues twice per month (both online and in print). At the same time, the citation format changed, from a citation format based on page numbers to one based on six-character citation

Publisher
American Institute of Physics
Country
United States
History
1931-present
Website
http://jap.aip.org/
Impact factor
2.064 (2010}}The Journal of Applied Physics is a Peer review peer-reviewed scientific journal published since 1931 by the American Institute of Physics . Its emphasis is on the understanding of the physics underpinning technology modern technology .The editor-in-chief is P. James Viccaro ( University of Chicago ). According to the Journal Citation Reports , the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 2.064. Journal Citation Reports , 2011)

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