Jury: DuPont should pay Ohio man $10.5M more in cancer suit

January 5, 2017

A federal jury says DuPont should pay an additional $10.5 million in damages to an Ohio man who says he got testicular cancer because of a chemical used to make Teflon.

Jurors in Columbus awarded Thursday in the lawsuit of Washington County resident Kenneth Vigneron Sr. The jury previously found DuPont should pay Vigneron $2 million in compensatory damages.

The lawsuit is among more than 3,000 alleging a link between illnesses and the chemical C8 emitted by a DuPont plant in West Virginia.

Court records show jurors determined DuPont was negligent and acted maliciously.

Vigneron's attorney argued DuPont knew C8 could cause cancer.

The Wilmington, Delaware-based chemical company said Thursday it will appeal. DuPont says it believes jurors were misled about the risks of C8 exposure.

Explore further: DuPont opens ASEAN headquarters in Singapore

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