Chemical in Teflon may cause cancer

June 30, 2005

A chemical DuPont Co. uses to make the non-stick covering Teflon is likely to cause cancer, an independent panel concluded.

The Science Advisory Board, an independent panel of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, issued a preliminary finding this week that is stronger than the EPA's preliminary report in January that perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA, may cause cancer in rats.

Environmental regulators began investigating the chemical after a 2003 study found people had low levels of PFOA in their blood up to four years after being exposed.

DuPont acknowledged the presence of PFOA in humans raises "questions that should be addressed," the Wall Street Journal reported.

A federal grand jury in May subpoenaed DuPont documents based on EPA complaints that DuPont failed to share information about the chemical's potential harm to humans.

DuPont said PFOA does not cause cancer in humans or pose a health risk.

The Science Advisory Board is expected to make its final recommendation later this year.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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