Video: Why it hurts to eat hot peppers

December 1, 2015, American Chemical Society
Credit: The American Chemical Society

You have probably had the burning sensation of eating a jalapeno or other tear-inducing pepper. What causes this painful fire in your mouth? The short answer is capsaicin. But what exactly is capsaicin? How does it work? Why do people drink milk to relieve the pain?

Reactions has the chemistry to answer all of these sizzling questions.

Check it out here before you order those extra chilies:

Explore further: Researchers uncover pain-relief secrets in hot chili peppers

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