Typhoon Kilo moving through northwestern Pacific Ocean

Typhoon Kilo moving through northwestern Pacific Ocean
At 11 a.m. EDT on Sept. 2, Typhoon Kilo's eye was visible in a GOES-West satellite image. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project

NOAA's GOES-West satellite spotted the eye in a strong Typhoon Kilo moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

At 11 a.m. EDT on September 2, Typhoon Kilo's maximum sustained winds were near 90 knots (103.6 mph/166.7 kph). It was centered near 24.3 North and 179.1 East, about 762 nautical miles east-northeast of Wake Island. Kilo was moving very slowly at 3 knots (3.4 mph/5.5 kph).

At that time, Typhoon Kilo's eye was visible in a satellite image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite. The image also showed powerful bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the low level center of circulation.

GOES-West is managed by NOAA. The image was created by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Fortunately, Kilo is in and is currently no threat to .

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Kilo to re-strengthen and continue tracking west. It is expected to peak in intensity on September 6.


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NASA spots Kilo, now a typhoon in the Northwestern Pacific

Citation: Typhoon Kilo moving through northwestern Pacific Ocean (2015, September 2) retrieved 17 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-09-typhoon-kilo-northwestern-pacific-ocean.html
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