Amazon hires 6K full-time workers for distribution centers

May 26, 2015 byMae Anderson

Amazon is hiring 6,000 full-time workers to staff up across its more than 50 distribution centers in the U.S.

The workers will pick, pack and ship products to fulfill customer orders. Currently Amazon has about 50,000 full-time workers at the centers.

Amazon has been opening distribution centers across the country in order to speed up times. Its $99 annual Prime membership service comes with free two-day delivery on many items.

The Seattle-based company employed about 154,100 full-time and part-time in total at the end of 2014.

Amazon in general has been expanding its Prime program's offerings in an effort to grow its membership with services such as grocery delivery, one-hour delivery in some cities, beefed up video streaming and the creation of a Bluetooth speaker called the Echo that syncs with Prime music.

Amazon will be hiring in the following cities:

CONNECTICUT

Windsor

DELAWARE

Middletown

INDIANA

Jeffersonville

Plainfield

Whitestown

KENTUCKY

Hebron

Lexington

MARYLAND

Baltimore

NEW JERSEY

Robbinsville

PENNSYLVANIA

Breinigsville

Carlisle

Hazleton

SOUTH CAROLINA

West Columbia

TENNESEE

Chattanooga

Murfreesboro

TEXAS

Haslet

VIRGINIA

Chester

Petersburg

WISCONSIN

Kenosha

Explore further: Amazon Prime members will be able to stream free on JetBlue

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