Researchers get rare lightning video

February 4, 2015, Florida Institute of Technology

A team of Florida Institute of Technology researchers led by Associate Professor Ningyu Liu has captured rare and hard-to-predict upward-moving lightning discharges on video, allowing for the study of this phenomenon in a way that has not been previously possible.

The study and accompanying video, which were published last month in Nature Communications, focus on the electrical activities of Tropical Depression Dorian in August 2013, which featured seven of these upward-moving events, each having unique optical and radio signatures.

Among those working alongside Liu was Nicholas Spiva, a senior physics major at Florida Tech who was killed in a motorcycle accident late last year. They were joined by College of Science Dean Hamid Rassoul and scientists from outside of the university to investigate these lightning discharges, laying the groundwork for future study.

These upward electrical discharges have previously been classified into three groups, based on their terminal altitudes: starters (20-30 km), jets (40-50 km), and gigantic jets (70-90 km). Prior to this work, typical observations of these discharges had been limited to one type per storm. By capturing these seven discharges, which included all three types, researchers will now better understand the similarities and differences between these types and study them in greater detail.

Low-light-level video of seven upward electrical discharges above Tropical Depression Dorian. The video is recorded by an automatic video acquisition system located on the roof of a building on the campus of Florida Institute of Technology.

One of the key findings from these new observations is that all seven events originated in the same thundercloud region, suggesting that these different kinds of events are generated by the same physical mechanism.

"Since 2001 our research team has been probing the mysteries of lightning," Rassoul said. "This latest observation represents yet another exciting discovery that will help us better understand the properties of lightning in all of its diverse forms."

Liu said that the upward electrical discharges transfer a large amount of electric charge into the upper atmosphere, which can potentially affect cloud formation and weather by modifying the global atmospheric electrical circuit, as well as the chemistry of the atmosphere. These discharges can also affect radio signals for long-range communication.

The same seven events recorded by a Sandia Allsky camera installed on the same Florida Tech site.

The team is currently studying this particular storm in depth for a better understanding of its meteorological and electrical characteristics.

"We are very curious about why this particular storm was able to generate those different forms of the upward , and what storm properties enabled the upward propagating leaders originating deep inside the storm to escape into space," Liu said.

Future research will focus on modeling the electrical activities of storms like this to understand how jets and gigantic jets are formed. The research team also hopes to upgrade their Florida Tech observation system so they can collect even higher quality images during future events.

The same seven events recorded by another Sandia Allsky camera located about 10 km northwest from the Florida Tech site.

Explore further: Lightning detected from space can indicate thundercloud height

More information: "Upward electrical discharges observed above Tropical Depression Dorian." Nature Communications 6, Article number: 5995 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms6995

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6 comments

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Whydening Gyre
1 / 5 (1) Feb 04, 2015
For some reason I thought ALL lightning was from the ground up...
dtxx
5 / 5 (1) Feb 04, 2015
For some reason I thought ALL lightning was from the ground up...


I will not tolerate the blaspheming of Zeus.
Whydening Gyre
1 / 5 (1) Feb 04, 2015
Zeus be damned...
He was only all about a trick of light...
Vietvet
4 / 5 (4) Feb 04, 2015
@Gyre
@dtxx

At least the EU idiots haven't commented ----yet.
dtxx
5 / 5 (2) Feb 04, 2015
Zeus be damned...
He was only all about a trick of light...


I still give Zeus the advantage over the christian god. Gazing upon Zeus would cause you to spontaneously incinerate, but at least you could see the freaking guy. He wasn't playing a game of hide and seek with us that has a special rule where he gets to be invisible and hide in the clouds.
Whydening Gyre
3.7 / 5 (3) Feb 04, 2015
Zeus be damned...
He was only all about a trick of light...


I still give Zeus the advantage over the christian god. Gazing upon Zeus would cause you to spontaneously incinerate, but at least you could see the freaking guy. He wasn't playing a game of hide and seek with us that has a special rule where he gets to be invisible and hide in the clouds.

Yeah, well, that god only had to trick ya with sound, then.
Us humans are so gullible...
You realize, of course, it's all metaphor, right?
(ignore the man behind the curtain...)

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