The Florida Institute of Technology (Florida Tech) traces its roots to the Brevard Engineering College established in 1958 to assist the space program at Cape Canaveral Florida. It was an opportunity to provide support and education for NASA scientists, engineers and technicians during the infancy of the space program in the USA. The name change to Florida Tech occurred in 1966. Today Florida Tech is a leading research, education and technology center located in Melbourne, Florida. Florida Tech's student body is around 6500 and primarily focuses on science, engineering, biomedical and technology areas of study. The Harris Center for Science and Engineering Center will begin construction in 2009 and the Scott Center for Autism Treatment has recently broke ground and will be up and running soon. The Ruth Funk Center for Textile Design is in the construction phase in part due to a generous gift by Ruth Funk.

Address
150 W. University Blvd. Melbourne, FL 32901
Website
http://www.fit.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florida_Institute_of_Technology

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No northern escape route for Florida's coral reefs

Warming seas are driving many species of marine life to shift their geographic ranges out of the tropics to higher latitudes where the water is cooler. Florida's reefs will not be able to make that northward move, however, ...

Research may help illuminate origins of life on Earth

One of the fundamental themes in astrobiology is to seek to ascertain the origin and distribution of life in the cosmos. As part of this, the field also deals with how life may be transferred from one planetary system to ...

Researchers deepen understanding of cellular stress responses

Chronic stress caused by changing temperatures, Alzheimer's disease or other diseases and forces is an unavoidable part of life. At the cellular level, the "first responders" to stress are known as molecular chaperones. Yet ...

Sensing bacterial communication

They may not have mouths or even vocal chords, but tiny organisms do communicate with one another. A Florida Tech study may give researchers and students further insight into that process.

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