Organic solar cells with high electric potential for portable electronics

October 11, 2012, University of Warwick
This is Professor Tim Jones, University of Warwick. Credit: University of Warwick

(Phys.org)—A new breakthrough in solar technology means portable electronic devices such as e-book readers could soon be re-charged on the move in low light levels and partial shading. Scientists from the University of Warwick, in collaboration with spin-out company Molecular Solar, have created an organic solar cell that generates a sufficiently high voltage to recharge a lithium-ion battery directly, without the need to connect multiple individual cells in series. Modules of these high voltage cells perform well in different light conditions including partial shade making them well matched to consumer electronic devices such as e-book readers, cameras and some mobile phones.

Organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, the so-called 'third generation' of , offer exciting opportunities thanks to the potential for very cheap manufacture, lightweight, low profile photovoltaics compatible with , which means they are ideally matched to portable electronic device applications.

This new OPV technology is a significant breakthrough as scientists have addressed the problem of low out-put voltage when the module is in low light levels or partial shading taking an important step towards rolling out cheap OPV cells in low-power portable electronics.

The scientists, from the University's Department of Chemistry, have demonstrated a cell with an open circuit voltage of over 7V which delivers maximum power at more than the 4.2V needed to power a standard .

This is the first time these features have been demonstrated using ultra OPV cells.

Professor Tim Jones, one of the lead researchers at University of Warwick, along with Dr Ross Hatton and Professor Mike Shipman, said:

"We have taken a big step towards cheap-to-make solar chargers which can top up your devices whenever they are being used – both indoors and out.

"A small light-weight no bigger than a credit card can be fitted to the battery of an e-book reader for example, and constantly top it up with power while you are reading it - even if you are sitting inside on the sofa.

"Alternatively, this kind of solar cell could be ideal for outdoor use as it is light-weight and portable.

"The next step is to extend this technology outside the laboratory to make cheap OPV chargers available on a commercial scale through Molecular Solar."

The research is detailed in the paper Ultra-high voltage multijunction organic for low-power electronic applications and was published in the journal Advanced Energy Materials.

Explore further: New record voltage for organic solar cells opens the tech to consumer electronics

More information: dx.doi.org/10.1002/aenm.201200560

Related Stories

Recommended for you

New fuel cell technology runs on solid carbon

January 22, 2018

Advancements in a fuel cell technology powered by solid carbon could make electricity generation from resources such as coal and biomass cleaner and more efficient, according to a new paper published by Idaho National Laboratory ...

Bio-renewable process could help 'green' plastic

January 19, 2018

When John Wesley Hyatt patented the first industrial plastic in 1869, his intention was to create an alternative to the elephant tusk ivory used to make piano keys. But this early plastic also sparked a revolution in the ...

Simulations show how atoms behave inside self-healing cement

January 19, 2018

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed a self-healing cement that could repair itself in as little as a few hours. Wellbore cement for geothermal applications has a life-span of only 30 ...

Looking to the sun to create hydrogen fuel

January 18, 2018

When Lawrence Livermore scientist Tadashi Ogitsu leased a hydrogen fuel-cell car in 2017, he knew that his daily commute would change forever. There are no greenhouse gases that come out of the tailpipe, just a bit of water ...

A new polymer raises the bar for lithium-sulfur batteries

January 18, 2018

Lithium-sulfur batteries are promising candidates for replacing common lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles since they are cheaper, weigh less, and can store nearly double the energy for the same mass. However, lithium-sulfur ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

PPihkala
not rated yet Oct 12, 2012
From the abstract:
We demonstrate ultra-high voltage small molecule multijunction devices with open circuit voltage (VOC) values of up to 7V. Optical modelling is employed to aid the optimisation of the complex multi-layer stacks and ensure current balancing is achieved between sub-cells, and optimised multijunction devices show power conversion efficiencies of up to 3.4% which is a modest increase over the single junction devices.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.