Best management practices for invasive crane flies in northeastern United States sod production

A new study recently published in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management (JIPM) explains the best management practices for consideration and adoption by sod producers in the northeastern U.S.

Two species of crane flies have become established across portions of northeastern United States and present an economic concern to the production sod industry. The infestation of production fields poses a threat to the quality of the developing sod product as well as a conduit for human-mediated range expansion of an . As the unintentional transport of in shipments of sod is a major repercussion, much of the burden from invasive crane fly establishments may fall on the consumer.

In the article "Best Management Practices for Invasive Crane Flies in Northeastern United States Sod Production," the JIPM authors discuss the crane fly's life history and ecology as a key element to recognizing and locating infestations in production fields.

They then explain the scientific rationale behind their recommendations for interventions with respect to basic (IPM) elements (monitoring populations, damage thresholds, cultural management, chemical and ).

Their recommendations are further summarized in a checklist with respect to sod production cycle (preharvest, harvest, postharvest). The goal of these practices is the prevention of in-field infestations, the protection of developing sod, the assurance of crane fly-free shipments, and the safeguarding of commercial customers.


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More information: The full article is available for free here.
Citation: Best management practices for invasive crane flies in northeastern United States sod production (2012, February 2) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-02-invasive-crane-flies-northeastern-states.html
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