Hunters bag record-breaking python in Florida Everglades

Two Florida hunters set a new record when they caught a Burmese python that measured a whopping 18 feet, 8.8 inches (5.71 meters), authorities in the southern state said Friday, as they encourage more people to eliminate ...

Invasional meltdown in multi-species plant communities

Invasive alien plant species can pose a serious threat to native biodiversity and to human well-being. Identifying the factors that contribute to invasion success is therefore crucial. Previous studies on biological invasions ...

Using mobile technology to predict invasive species transmission

A cooler full of fish might not be the only thing anglers bring back from a trip to the lake. Unknowingly, they may also be transporting small aquatic "hitchhikers" that attach themselves to boats, motors ― and even fishing ...

Chronically understudied, fences hold grave ecological threats

Fences are one of humanity's most frequent landscape alterations, with their combined length exceeding even that of roads by an order of magnitude. Despite their ubiquity, they have received far less research scrutiny than ...

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Invasive species

Invasive species is a phrase with several definitions. The first definition expresses the phrase in terms of non-indigenous species (e.g. plants or animals) that adversely affect the habitats they invade economically, environmentally or ecologically. It has been used in this sense by government organizations as well as conservation groups such as the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature).

The second definition broadens the boundaries to include both native and non-native species that heavily colonize a particular habitat.

The third definition is an expansion of the first and defines an invasive species as a widespread non-indigenous species. This last definition is arguably too broad as not all non-indigenous species necessarily have an adverse effect on their adopted environment. An example of this broader use would include the claim that the common goldfish (Carassius auratus) is invasive. Although it is common outside its range globally, it almost never appears in harmful densities.

Because of the ambiguity of its definition, the phrase invasive species is often criticized as an imprecise term within the field of ecology. This article concerns the first two definitions; for the third, see introduced species.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA