Related topics: climate change · extinction · plants · biodiversity · plos one

Updating Turing's model of pattern formation

In 1952, Alan Turing published a study which described mathematically how systems composed of many living organisms can form rich and diverse arrays of orderly patterns. He proposed that this 'self-organization' arises from ...

Success in promoting plant growth for biodiesel

In JST Strategic Basic Research Programs, a group led by Zhongrui Duan (Researcher, Waseda University) and Motoki Tominaga (Associate professor, Waseda University) succeeded in promoting plant growth and increasing seed yield ...

Why it's important to save parasites

Unlike the many charismatic mammals, fish and birds that receive our attention, parasites are thought of as something to eradicate—not something to protect.

Novel 3-D printed 'reef tiles' to repopulate coral communities

Architects and marine scientists at the University of Hong Kong (HKU) have jointly developed a novel method for coral restoration making use of specially designed 3-D printed artificial 'reef tiles' for attachment by corals ...

Scales of critically endangered pangolin seized in Sumatra

An investigation led by a member of the Tiger Protection and Conservation Units—established in Sumatra by Fauna & Flora International (FFI) over two decades ago to safeguard Kerinci Seblat National Park's apex predators ...

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Species

In biology, a species is:

There are many definitions of what kind of unit a species is (or should be). A common definition is that of a group of organisms capable of interbreeding and producing fertile offspring, and separated from other such groups with which interbreeding does not (normally) happen. Other definitions may focus on similarity of DNA or morphology. Some species are further subdivided into subspecies, and here also there is no close agreement on the criteria to be used.

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