Related topics: climate change · extinction · plants · biodiversity · plos one

Breakthrough in battle against invasive plants

Plants that can "bounce back" after disturbances like plowing, flooding or drought are the most likely to be "invasive" if they're moved to new parts of the world, scientists say.

Academy scientists describe 71 new species in 2019

In 2019, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 71 new plant and animal species to our family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our ability to make informed ...

How flowers adapt to their pollinators

Flowering plants are characterized by an astonishing diversity of flowers of different shapes and sizes. This diversity has arisen in adaptation to selection imposed by different pollinators including, among others, bees, ...

Wildfire may benefit forest bats: study

Bats face many threats—from habitat loss and climate change to emerging diseases, such as white-nose syndrome. But it appears that wildfire is not among those threats, suggests a study from the University of California, ...

New insights into regulation of root initiation

When young, dark-grown seedlings of thale cress are given light, they start to form roots from the stem-like part of the plant called the hypocotyl. Abdellah Lakehal used this system to study how the initiation of these adventitious ...

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Species

In biology, a species is:

There are many definitions of what kind of unit a species is (or should be). A common definition is that of a group of organisms capable of interbreeding and producing fertile offspring, and separated from other such groups with which interbreeding does not (normally) happen. Other definitions may focus on similarity of DNA or morphology. Some species are further subdivided into subspecies, and here also there is no close agreement on the criteria to be used.

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