Related topics: gulf of mexico · oil spills · oil · invasive species · water

Below-average Gulf of Mexico 'dead zone' measured

Today, NOAA-supported scientists announced that this year's Gulf of Mexico "dead zone"— an area of low to no oxygen that can kill fish and marine life—is approximately 3,275 square miles. That's more than 2 million acres ...

Lake Michigan water level rise affects inland waterways

2020 marked Lake Michigan's highest water level in 120 years, experts said, and climate variance makes future water levels challenging to predict. Coastal impacts are well-documented, but the effect of lake level rise on ...

Hot spring forecast: Drought deepens in West, flooding ebbs

There's no relief in sight for the West's record-shattering megadrought, which will likely only deepen this spring, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said in its seasonal outlook Thursday. But central and ...

How do we solve the problem of agricultural nutrient runoff?

Agricultural runoff from Midwestern farms is a major contributor to a vast "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico. Nitrogen, phosphorous and other farm nutrients drain into the Mississippi River, which empties into the Gulf, spurring ...

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Mississippi River

The Mississippi River is the second-longest river in the United States, with a length of 2,320 miles (3,730 km) from its source in Lake Itasca in Minnesota to its mouth in the Gulf of Mexico.

The Mississippi River is part of the Missouri-Mississippi river system, which is the largest river system in North America and among the largest in the world: by length (3,900 miles (6,300 km)), it is the fourth longest, and by its average discharge of 572,000 cu ft/s (16,200 m³/s), it is the tenth largest.

The name Mississippi is derived from the Ojibwe word misi-ziibi ("Great River") or gichi-ziibi ("Big River").

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA