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Ocean warming is paradoxically driving bottom-dwelling invertebrates—including sea scallops, blue mussels, surfclams and quahogs that are valuable to the shellfish industry—into warmer waters and threatening their survival, ...

Social experiences impact zebrafish from an early age

It is commonly said that childhood experiences shape adult behavior; that events that we may not even remember can have long-lasting or even permanent effects. In a new article by scientists at the Champalimaud Center for ...

Bumblebee larval growth impaired by insecticide

Researchers from Royal Holloway have found that an insecticide used in more than 81 countries, including within the EU, could contribute to a global decline in bumblebees.

Giant Sunfish larva identified for the first time

Australian and New Zealand scientists have, for the first time, successfully identified the tiny larva of the giant Bump-head Sunfish (Mola alexandrini). Led by sunfish expert, Dr. Marianne Nyegaard from the Auckland War ...

A new species of darkling beetle larvae that degrade plastic

An enormous plastic garbage island exists in the North Pacific that is seven times the size of the Korean Peninsula. The island, called the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, is the result of 13 million tons of plastic that flow ...

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Larvae

In Roman mythology, the larvae or lemures (singular lemur) were the spectres or spirits of the dead; they were the malignant version of the lares. Some Roman writers describe lemures as the common name for all the spirits of the dead, and divide them into two classes: the lares, or the benevolent souls of the family, which haunted and guarded the domus or household, and the larvae, or the restless and fearful souls of wicked men. But the more common idea was that the Lemures and Larvae were the same. They were said to wander about at night and to torment and frighten the living.

On May 9, 11, and 13, the Lemuralia or Lemuria, the feast of the Lemures, occurred, when black beans were offered to the Larvae in the hopes of propitiating them; loud noises were also used to frighten them away.

Lemurs were so named by Linnaeus for their large eyes, nocturnal habits and unearthly noises they make at night. Some species of lemur were identified by their calls before scientists had seen individuals. Linnaeus also coined the modern use of the word 'larva' to denote the caterpillar stage in the life cycle of insects.

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