NASA TRMM satellite data show areas of Alex's heavy rainfall

July 1, 2010
This flood map was created on July 1 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT) from TRMM data, and shows estimated rainfall from Hurricane Alex. The red areas indicate as much as 10 inches of rainfall, while the yellow areas indicate up to 5 inches. The heaviest rainfall is apparent in northeastern Mexico. Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce

Areas of northeastern Mexico were slammed with heavy rainfall, and NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite estimated more than 10 inches of rainfall fell in various locations and that data was used to create a rainfall map.

Heavy rain amounts from satellites and flood inundation calculations from a hydrological are updated every three hours globally with the results shown on the "Global Flood and Landslide Monitoring" area of NASA's Measuring Mission (TRMM) web page.

A flood map created on July 1 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT) from TRMM data, and shows estimated rainfall from Hurricane Alex. The map is color coded where red areas indicate as much as 10 inches of rainfall, while the yellow areas indicate up to 5 inches. The heaviest rainfall appeared in northeastern Mexico on the latest flood map.

The (TMI) showed that Alex had a well defined eye containing powerful thunderstorms that were dropping extreme amounts of rain as it was making landfall. The analysis indicates that an area in southeastern Texas, that was away from the center of the hurricane, had the most intense rainfall with rain rates over 36 mm/hr (~1.41 inches/hour).

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