NASA Scans Ivan Inside for 3D Image

September 16, 2004
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite scanned Hurricane Ivan in the Gulf of Mexico Wednesday, September 15

On the morning of September 15, 2004, NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite captured a 3-D look inside Hurricane Ivan, still a Category 4 storm. This unique look at Ivan shows the structure of rainfall inside the storm where red represents precipitation of 2 or more inches per hour. NASA scientists are watching the tall spires or "hot towers" inside the storm for clues about intensity fluctuations as Ivan approaches landfall. Ivan will be the third major hurricane to make landfall in the U.S. while another tropical storm, Jeanne, waits in the wings.

The above image from the NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite scanned Hurricane Ivan in the Gulf of Mexico Wednesday, September 15, 2004. Blue = 0.25 inches/hour, green = 0.50 inches/hour, yellow = 1.00 inches/hour, and red = 2.00+ inches/hour. Credit: NASA/NASDA.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite scanned Hurricane Ivan in the Gulf of Mexico Wednesday, September 15

The above image from the NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite scanned Hurricane Ivan in the Gulf of Mexico Wednesday, September 15, 2004. Blue = 0.25 inches/hour, green = 0.50 inches/hour, yellow = 1.00 inches/hour, and red = 2.00+ inches/hour. Credit: NASA/NASDA.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite scanned Hurricane Ivan in the Gulf of Mexico Wednesday, September 15

The above image from the NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite scanned Hurricane Ivan in the Gulf of Mexico Wednesday, September 15, 2004. Blue = 0.25 inches/hour, green = 0.50 inches/hour, yellow = 1.00 inches/hour, and red = 2.00+ inches/hour. High Resolution Image Credit: NASA/NASDA.

Source: NASA

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Humans threaten crucial 'fossil' groundwater: study

April 25, 2017

Human activity risks contaminating pristine water locked underground for millennia and long thought impervious to pollution, said a study on Tuesday that warned of a looming threat to the crucial resource.

Upward mobility has fallen sharply in US: study

April 24, 2017

In a sign of the fading American Dream, 92 percent of children born in 1940 earned more than their parents, but only half of those born in 1984 can say the same, researchers said Monday.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.