Non-contact sensors can detect a heartbeat up to a meter away

June 29, 2010, University of Sussex

Research team's non-contact sensors set to transform telecare heart monitoring
(PhysOrg.com) -- Sensors that can detect a heartbeat up to a meter away are now a reality thanks to a team of scientists at the University of Sussex.

The Electric Potential (EPS) are the first electrical sensors that can detect precisely the of the heart without direct resistive contact with the body. The new sensors will make monitoring a patient's heartbeat, whilst they relax in their hospital bed or in their home, easier and less invasive than ever before.

With commercial interest building quickly, the team of Sussex researchers believes the EPS will offer medical and home health professionals the opportunity to develop patient-friendly, self administered systems to monitor their vital signs with the minimum impact on their mobility.

The sensitivity of these sensors means they can also be used to detect muscle signals and eye movements and, in future, will be developed to detect brain and nerve-fibre signals. The EPS research group team, based in the University of Sussex's School of Engineering and Design, is lead by Dr Robert Prance, Professor of Sensor Technology.

Dr Prance said: "These sensors are the result of a sustained research programme at Sussex. For the first time we are able to detect electrical signals from the body passively, without making physical contact, and in familiar environments such as the home or hospital."

Thanks to a South East Health Technology Alliance (SEHTA) grant, the team is currently working with in-home smart technology company PassivSystems to evaluate whether the sensors could be used to help elderly and frail people live independently in their homes by monitoring occupancy in a room and even whether someone's heartbeat has changed.

SEHTA Chief Executive Officer David Parry explained: "Remote telecare can play a crucial role in helping people to remain in their homes rather than going into sheltered accommodation, but the current Passive InfraRed sensors require movement to detect a person's presence and cannot easily differentiate between multiple people in a room. The sensors developed by the University of Sussex have incredible potential."

Explore further: Nano researchers build new and improved humidity sensors

More information: For more information go to: www.sinc.co.uk/sinc_companies/ … ssex_ep_sensors.html

Related Stories

Wireless patients

May 26, 2010

A wireless monitoring system for people with debilitating conditions such as Parkinson's disease or chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) could allow healthcare workers to assess a patient's health and the development ...

Mobile Electronic Devices Learn to Smell

September 16, 2004

Siemens researchers have succeeded in developing novel mini-sensors that can detect gases and smells. Mobile electronic devices will be used in future to measure the ozone level in the air and warn if it exceeds the limits, ...

New sensors capable of measuring damage to infrastructure

January 5, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Dr. Genda Chen, professor of civil, architectural and environmental engineering at Missouri University of Science and Technology, was recently awarded a patent for "Strain Sensitive Coax Cable Sensors for ...

Recommended for you

Study suggests trees are crucial to the future of our cities

March 25, 2019

The shade of a single tree can provide welcome relief from the hot summer sun. But when that single tree is part of a small forest, it creates a profound cooling effect. According to a study published today in the Proceedings ...

Matter waves and quantum splinters

March 25, 2019

Physicists in the United States, Austria and Brazil have shown that shaking ultracold Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) can cause them to either divide into uniform segments or shatter into unpredictable splinters, depending ...

Apple pivot led by star-packed video service

March 25, 2019

With Hollywood stars galore, Apple unveiled its streaming video plans Monday along with news and game subscription offerings as part of an effort to shift its focus to digital content and services to break free of its reliance ...

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Bob_Kob
not rated yet Jun 30, 2010
Closer to the modern warfare2 'heartbeat detector'!
kevinrtrs
1 / 5 (1) Jun 30, 2010
Strange that all the benefits are discussed but nothing is said about the technology involved, specifically what makes it so good.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.