Related topics: brain · neurons · electrical signals · brain cells · heart

Searching beyond seismology for earthquake precursors

To predict when earthquakes are likely to occur, seismologists often use statistics to monitor how clusters of seismic activity evolve over time. However, this approach often fails to anticipate the time and magnitude of ...

Dogs may never learn that every sound of a word matters

Despite their excellent auditory capacities, dogs do not attend to differences between words that differ only in one phoneme (e.g., "dog" vs "dig"), according to a new study by Hungarian researchers of the Eötvös Loránd ...

Rat spinal cords control neural function in biobots

Biological robots, or biobots, draw inspiration from natural systems to mimic the motions of organisms, such as swimming or jumping. Improvements to biobots to better replicate complex motor behaviors can lead to exciting ...

Chemist develops flower-like catalysts from graphene

A RUDN chemist and colleagues from Iran have developed a new strategy for producing hollow, porous catalysts for the Heck coupling reaction. These catalysts are characterized by a flower-like structure. They consist of graphene, ...

A new antiseizure target?

Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of epilepsy with focal seizures, and about one-third of individuals with TLE experience seizures that do not respond to medical treatment.

Researchers discover molecular light switch in photoreceptor cells

How our eyes detect and respond to changes in light intensity is determined by specialized cells in the eye called photoreceptors. In addition to converting light into electrical signals, effectively allowing us to see, rod-shaped ...

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Electrical phenomena

Electrical phenomena are commonplace and unusual events that can be observed which illuminate the principles of the physics of electricity and are explained by them. Electrical phenomena are a somewhat arbitrary division of electromagnetic phenomena.

Some examples are

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