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How rocket science may improve kidney dialysis

A team of researchers in the United Kingdom has found a way to redesign an artificial connection between an artery and vein, known as an Arterio-Venous Fistulae, which surgeons form in the arms of people ...

dateMar 17, 2015 in Soft Matter
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Mathematicians model fluids at the mesoscale

When it comes to boiling water—or the phenomenon of applying heat to a liquid until it transitions to a gas—is there anything left for today's scientists to study? The surprising answer is, yes, quite ...

dateMar 06, 2015 in Soft Matter
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Going with the flow

Previous research has already demonstrated that substantial quantities of self-motile or active agents such as bacteria in a fluid environment can be harnessed to do mechanical work like moving microscopic ...

dateJan 15, 2015 in Soft Matter
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Malaria: Blood cells behaving badly

All the billions of flat, biconcave disks in our body known as red blood cells (or erythrocytes) make three basic, tumbling-treadmill-type motions when they wend their way through the body's bloodstream ferrying ...

dateJun 10, 2014 in Soft Matter
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Physicists working to cure 'dry eye' disease

The eye is an exquisitely sensitive system with many aspects that remain somewhat of a mystery—both in the laboratory and in the clinic. A U.S.-based team of mathematicians and optometrists is working to change this by ...

dateMay 06, 2014 in Soft Matter
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What makes flying snakes such gifted gliders?

Animal flight behavior is an exciting frontier for engineers to both apply knowledge of aerodynamics and to learn from nature's solutions to operating in the air. Flying snakes are particularly intriguing ...

dateMar 04, 2014 in Soft Matter
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Self-steering particles go with the flow

MIT chemical engineers have designed tiny particles that can "steer" themselves along preprogrammed trajectories and align themselves to flow through the center of a microchannel, making it possible to control ...

dateNov 11, 2013 in Soft Matter
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How the kettle got its whistle

(Phys.org) —Researchers have finally worked out where the noise that makes kettles whistle actually comes from – a problem which has puzzled scientists for more than 100 years.

dateOct 25, 2013 in Soft Matter
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Squeezing in the micro-domain

While the air pressure in a wheel and the blood pressure inside a human body can precisely be measured, it is still a challenge to measure the pressure inside microscopic objects such as cells in our bodies.

Clues to foam formation could help find oil

Blowing bubbles in the backyard is one thing and quite another when searching for oil. That distinction is at the root of new research by Rice University scientists who describe in greater detail than ever ...

Chasing the black holes of the ocean

According to researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Miami, some of the largest ocean eddies on Earth are mathematically equivalent to the mysterious black holes of space. These eddies are so tightly ...

Computer model predicts red blood cell flow

Adjacent to the walls of our arterioles, capillaries, and venules—the blood vessels that make up our microcirculation—there exists a peculiar thin layer of clear plasma, devoid of red blood cells. Although it is just ...

Simulating flow from volcanoes and oil spills

Some time around 37,000 BCE a massive volcano erupted in the Campanian region of Italy, blanketing much of Europe with ash, stunting plant growth and possibly dooming the Neanderthals. While our prehistoric relatives had ...

Spheres can form squares

Everybody who has tried to stack oranges in a box knows that a regular packing of spheres in a flat layer naturally leads to a hexagonal pattern, where each sphere is surrounded by six neighbours in a honeycomb-like ...

Bubble mattress reduces drag in fluidic chip

Researchers at the University of Twente's MESA+ research institute have given the first demonstration of how the drag exerted on liquids flowing through tiny "fluidic chips" is affected by the introduction of diminutive gas ...

The nanostructure of edible fats

Researchers at DOE's Brookhaven are using the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) to categorize the many facets of fat crystals. They've learned that the distribution and directionality of these crystal ...

Basic science in evaporating droplets

What happens if you slowly evaporate a droplet containing dissolved particles? The question sounds simple, but it involves a surprising amount of basic physics and mathematics. Hanneke Gelderblom of the University ...

Soft Lego built in the computer

Barbara Capone of the Computational Physics Group of the University of Vienna has developed a new method for the construction of building blocks at the nanoscale. The researcher in Soft Matter Physics, who ...

Babies as young as 6 months using mobile media
Astronomers find runaway galaxies
Smaller and cheaper particle accelerators?
Black hole hunters tackle a cosmic conundrum
Heat still on despite warming slowdown
Student creates powerful catalyst from potassium

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