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Soft Matter news

Self-steering particles go with the flow

MIT chemical engineers have designed tiny particles that can "steer" themselves along preprogrammed trajectories and align themselves to flow through the center of a microchannel, making it possible to control ...

Nov 11, 2013 4.3 / 5 (3) 0 | with audio podcast

How the kettle got its whistle

(Phys.org) —Researchers have finally worked out where the noise that makes kettles whistle actually comes from – a problem which has puzzled scientists for more than 100 years.

Oct 25, 2013 4.7 / 5 (38) 11 | with audio podcast

Squeezing in the micro-domain

While the air pressure in a wheel and the blood pressure inside a human body can precisely be measured, it is still a challenge to measure the pressure inside microscopic objects such as cells in our bodies.

Oct 10, 2013 5 / 5 (2) 0

Clues to foam formation could help find oil

Blowing bubbles in the backyard is one thing and quite another when searching for oil. That distinction is at the root of new research by Rice University scientists who describe in greater detail than ever ...

Oct 08, 2013 not rated yet 0 | with audio podcast

Chasing the black holes of the ocean

According to researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Miami, some of the largest ocean eddies on Earth are mathematically equivalent to the mysterious black holes of space. These eddies are so tightly ...

Sep 23, 2013 4.5 / 5 (22) 3 | with audio podcast

Computer model predicts red blood cell flow

Adjacent to the walls of our arterioles, capillaries, and venules—the blood vessels that make up our microcirculation—there exists a peculiar thin layer of clear plasma, devoid of red blood cells. Although it is just ...

Aug 13, 2013 5 / 5 (1) 0

Simulating flow from volcanoes and oil spills

Some time around 37,000 BCE a massive volcano erupted in the Campanian region of Italy, blanketing much of Europe with ash, stunting plant growth and possibly dooming the Neanderthals. While our prehistoric relatives had ...

Aug 12, 2013 4 / 5 (1) 0

Spheres can form squares

Everybody who has tried to stack oranges in a box knows that a regular packing of spheres in a flat layer naturally leads to a hexagonal pattern, where each sphere is surrounded by six neighbours in a honeycomb-like ...

May 24, 2013 4.7 / 5 (3) 0

Bubble mattress reduces drag in fluidic chip

Researchers at the University of Twente's MESA+ research institute have given the first demonstration of how the drag exerted on liquids flowing through tiny "fluidic chips" is affected by the introduction of diminutive gas ...

May 14, 2013 5 / 5 (1) 0 | with audio podcast

The nanostructure of edible fats

Researchers at DOE's Brookhaven are using the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) to categorize the many facets of fat crystals. They've learned that the distribution and directionality of these crystal ...

Apr 26, 2013 5 / 5 (4) 0

Basic science in evaporating droplets

What happens if you slowly evaporate a droplet containing dissolved particles? The question sounds simple, but it involves a surprising amount of basic physics and mathematics. Hanneke Gelderblom of the University ...

Apr 18, 2013 3.8 / 5 (4) 8

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Soft Lego built in the computer

Barbara Capone of the Computational Physics Group of the University of Vienna has developed a new method for the construction of building blocks at the nanoscale. The researcher in Soft Matter Physics, who ...

Leeches help save woman's ear after pit bull mauling

Venture investments jump to $9.5B in 1Q

Scientists tether lionfish to Cayman reefs

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

Researchers develop printable lasers

(Phys.org)—A way of printing lasers using everyday inkjet technology has been created by scientists. The development has a wide range of possible applications, ranging from biomedical testing to laser arrays ...

'Bed of nails' material for clean surfaces

(Phys.org)—Scientists at the University of Twente's MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology have developed a new material that is not only extremely water-repellent but also extremely oil-repellent. It contains ...

Sandcastle building is no child's play, say physicists

All children who build sandcastles on the beach know that in addition to sand you also need to add a little water to prevent the structure from collapsing. But why is this? In an article which appeared today in Scientific Re ...

Engineers model the threat of avalanches

(Phys.org) -- Snow avalanches, a real threat in countries from Switzerland to Afghanistan, are fundamentally a physics problem: What are the physical laws that govern how they start, grow and move, and can theoretical modeling ...

White House updating online privacy policy

Cosmologists weigh cosmic filaments and voids

Six Nepalese dead, six missing in Everest avalanche

China says massive area of its soil polluted

Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced

There's something ancient in the icebox

Sound increases the efficiency of boiling

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology achieved a 17-percent increase in boiling efficiency by using an acoustic field to enhance heat transfer. The acoustic field does this by efficiently removing vapor bubbles ...

How to make a splash

(Phys.org) -- A team of physicists has used the high-energy x-rays of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory to penetrate the everyday mystery of a splash, revealing previously hidden ...

Biologists help solve fungi mysteries

Thinnest feasible nano-membrane produced

Turning off depression in the brain

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