Playboy to Set Up the Mansion in Second Life

May 13, 2007

Hugh Hefner's infamous lad mag will be bringing Playboy bunny avatars to the popular virtual world, Second Life.

Hugh Hefner's infamous lad mag, Playboy, responsible for jumpstarting the careers of many a buxom lady, announced that bunny avatars will be setting up shop in the popular virtual world beginning in June.

Details on how exactly Playboy will appear in Second Life are scarce, though one can imagine a virtual Playboy mansion and grotto are in the works. And although most Second Life marketing schemes haven't met with much success, there's little doubt that teleporting (as avatars are wont to travel) into a pool full of nubile young women will have some appeal.

As if mom didn't have enough to worry about when junior is at virtual play: Earlier this week UK police revealed they were investigating a German Second Life avatar who put child pornography images up for sale and paid for sex with underage players or players posing as minors.

Linden Lab, owner and operator of Second Life, said it would cooperate with the investigation and ban any users who engage in, advertise or promote locations or activities involving the depiction of sexual or lewd acts involving minors.

"We simply will not tolerate the depiction of sexual or lewd acts involving minors in Second Life," the company said in its statement on its blog.

Second Life currently boasts approximately 6.2 million "residents," though only 1.8 million have logged on in the last 60 days, according to statistics from Linden Lab.

But fear not fretful moms and pops. The kids can find safe options to cruise the virtual space. Second Life is virtual home to hundreds of non-risque companies, including L'Oreal, Calvin Klein, Reebok and even the news service Reuters.

Linden Lab even created a teen version of its virtual world. Minors are not allowed on the adult grid and no adults, other than Linden Lab employees, are allowed on the teen site.

Copyright 2007 by Ziff Davis Media, Distributed by United Press International

Explore further: Survey concludes Internet access should be a human right

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study identifies why re-educating torturers may not work

17 minutes ago

Many human rights educators assume – incorrectly, as it turns out – that police and military officers in India who support the torture of suspects do so because they are either immoral or ignorant. This ...

Singapore moves to regulate taxi booking apps

22 minutes ago

Singapore on Friday announced new rules for mobile taxi booking apps, including US-based Uber, in the latest move by governments around the world to regulate the increasingly popular services.

Plant immunity comes at a price

27 minutes ago

Plants are under permanent attack by a multitude of pathogens. To win the battle against fungi, bacteria, viruses and other pathogens, they have developed a complex and effective immune system. And just as ...

Recommended for you

Spotify prompts industry debates on streaming

7 hours ago

From board rooms in Japan to songwriter's rooms in Nashville, a debate is brewing in music industry circles about the financial and creative value of streaming music, even as its popularity and impact skyrocket.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.