Kansas OKs anti-evolution teaching rule

Nov 09, 2005

The Kansas Board of Education approved anti-evolution science teaching standards Tuesday, despite vocal criticism from educators, scientists and citizens.

The board voted 6-4 to approve the controversial standards that redefine science to allow for non-natural explanations -- a change opponents said was motivated solely by religious beliefs.

The vote followed the board's conservative-moderate split and had been expected for months, the Kansas City Star reported, noting the vote came despite a litany of complaints voiced during a morning public session.

The National Academy of Sciences and the National Science Teachers Association withdrew their material from the standards in protest. That means the Kansas Department of Education will have to rewrite those sections to avoid the copyrighted language.

A moderate Republican board member earlier Tuesday urged the vote be postponed until the copyright problems can be resolved. The six conservative board members voted against that motion.

Those conservative board members sat silent during the public comment session, but former board chairwoman Linda Holloway spoke as one of their few defenders, saying the changes are "the next step in breaking the shackles of evolution."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Changing dinosaur tracks spurs novel approach

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Sprint raises offer to buy Clearwire for $2.2B

Dec 17, 2012

Sprint, the third-largest U.S. cellphone company, said Monday that it will buy out the portion of wireless network operator Clearwire that it doesn't already own after raising its offer price to $2.2 billion.

US state headed for another debate over evolution

Jun 06, 2012

(AP) — The central state of Kansas, which has attracted international attention and some ridicule for its debate over how evolution is taught in its public schools, is headed toward another showdown on the subject.

Abortion rights foes look to spread fetal pain law

Dec 10, 2010

(AP) -- Abortion rights foes emboldened by a new Nebraska law that restricts late-term procedures based on the disputed notion that fetuses can feel pain after 20 weeks are pushing for similar legislation in other states, ...

Brain docs raise concussion alarm for kids' sports

Nov 01, 2010

(AP) -- The risk of concussions from football and some other sports is so serious that a qualified athletic trainer should always be on the field - at adult and children's games, and even at practice, a major ...

Recommended for you

Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for

13 hours ago

A statistical analysis of the gift "fulfillments" at several hundred online wedding gift registries suggests that wedding guests are caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to buying an appropriate gift for the ...

Can new understanding avert tragedy?

16 hours ago

As a boy growing up in Syracuse, NY, Sol Hsiang ran an experiment for a school project testing whether plants grow better sprinkled with water vs orange juice. Today, 20 years later, he applies complex statistical ...

Crowd-sourcing Britain's Bronze Age

16 hours ago

A new joint project by the British Museum and the UCL Institute of Archaeology is seeking online contributions from members of the public to enhance a major British Bronze Age archive and artefact collection.

Roman dig 'transforms understanding' of ancient port

16 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Researchers from the universities of Cambridge and Southampton have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the ancient Roman port of Ostia, proving the city was much larger than previously ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for

A statistical analysis of the gift "fulfillments" at several hundred online wedding gift registries suggests that wedding guests are caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to buying an appropriate gift for the ...

Can new understanding avert tragedy?

As a boy growing up in Syracuse, NY, Sol Hsiang ran an experiment for a school project testing whether plants grow better sprinkled with water vs orange juice. Today, 20 years later, he applies complex statistical ...

Roman dig 'transforms understanding' of ancient port

(Phys.org) —Researchers from the universities of Cambridge and Southampton have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the ancient Roman port of Ostia, proving the city was much larger than previously ...

Crowd-sourcing Britain's Bronze Age

A new joint project by the British Museum and the UCL Institute of Archaeology is seeking online contributions from members of the public to enhance a major British Bronze Age archive and artefact collection.

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...