British project helps save rare species

Jun 19, 2006

Reclamation of 200-square miles of British coalfields is being credited for saving rare species of animals from extinction.

Adders, lapwings and otters are among the species starting to flourish again in parts of Britain's National Forest -- the nation's largest ongoing environmental project, The London Telegraph reported Monday.

Officials hope to increase the woodland cover of the area from six percent to more than 33 percent. So far, nearly seven million trees have been planted, covering about 16 percent of the land, the newspaper said.

Viv Astling, former chairman of the National Forest Company, said: "It's a great benefit to see the thriving wildlife and the return of species which were very rare in this country, to the point of them being endangered. One of the most exciting things about the whole project is that we won't be around to see it in its full glory.

"It will be handed down from generation to generation and in 100 years or so it will be completely established. How often in life can you say you've helped change 200 square miles of the country?

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: US exports help Germany increase coal, pollution

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Catching grease to cut grill pollution

42 minutes ago

A team of University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering students have designed a tray that when placed under the grates of a backyard grill reduces by 70 percent the level of a harmful ...

Recommended for you

Pacific summit to urge action on climate change

3 hours ago

Pacific island leaders will renew calls for meaningful action on climate change at a regional summit opening in Palau on Tuesday, amid fears rising seas will swamp their low-lying nations.

US plans widespread seismic testing of sea floor

Jul 26, 2014

(AP)—The U.S. government is planning to use sound blasting to conduct research on the ocean floor along most of the East Coast, using technology similar to that which led to a court battle by environmentalists in New Jersey.

Fire ecology manipulation by California native cultures

Jul 26, 2014

Before the colonial era, 100,000s of people lived on the land now called California, and many of their cultures manipulated fire to control the availability of plants they used for food, fuel, tools, and ritual. Contemporary ...

User comments : 0