Earliest hominid: Not a hominid at all?

The earliest known hominid fossil, which dates to about 7 million years ago, is actually some kind of ape, according to an international team of researchers led by the University of Michigan. The finding, they say, suggests ...

Biologists want to save trout with poison

For the fifth time, biologists are reportedly proposing to poison a remote Sierra stream to restore what might be America's rarest trout.

NASA assigns crew for shuttle mission

NASA has assigned crew members to the space shuttle flight that will launch an Italian-built U.S. module for the International Space Station.

Nanoparticles and Lasers Create Cancer-Killing Microbubbles

One promising use of gold nanoparticles is to use them to convert laser energy into heat that can kill malignant cells. Now, in a promising twist on this approach to anticancer therapy, an international team of investigators ...

Discovering How to Focus on Tiniest of the Very Small

If you need a good picture of a molecule, your first job is getting its atoms to pose for you, says John Silcox, Cornell's David E. Burr Professor of Engineering and an expert in the realm of the very tiny.

Pace Quickens for NASA Spacecraft Orbiting Mars

NASA's newest spacecraft at Mars has already cut the size and duration of each orbit by more than half, just 11 weeks into a 23-week process of shrinking its orbit. By other indicators, the lion's share of the job lies ahead.

Corals facing 'biggest impact in history'

A new study has found that the damage caused by human activity to some of the world's iconic coral reefs in the past 30 years is greater than at any time in the last 220,000 years.

S&P sees tough times ahead for telecom

Slow growth is expected in the U.S. telecommunications both this year and next, credit raters Standard & Poor's said Monday.

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