New kind of fuel cell delivers energy and fine chemicals with no waste from renewable raw materials

Sep 24, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- The concept of converting renewable raw materials so cleverly that the same process simultaneously produces both energy and industrially desirable chemicals has been high on the wish-list for those who seek environmentally friendly and resource-saving chemistry. The process should also not release any carbon dioxide.

In the journal , Hansjorg Grutzmacher, Francesco Vizza, and Claudio Bianchini and their co-workers from the ETH in Zurich (Switzerland) and the Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR) in Sesto Fiorentino (Italy) have now introduced a new kind of fuel cell: an organometallic fuel cell that efficiently converts alcohols and sugars into .

Differing from established alcohol fuel cells—the direct alcohol fuel cell and the enzymatic cell—the organometallic fuel cell (OMFC) works in a completely different way. The secret behind its success is a special molecular complex of rhodium metal that functions as an anode catalyst. The scientists deposited the complex onto a carbon powder support. The interesting thing is that the active catalyst forms during the chemical reaction, and changes step-by-step throughout the catalytic cycle. In this way, a single metal complex forms different catalysts that are each specific for an individual reaction step: the conversion of an alcohol (e.g. ethanol) into the corresponding aldehyde, making the into the corresponding carboxylic acid (e.g. acetic acid), and transferring protons (H+) and electrons. As well as alcohols, this system can also convert sugars such as glucose in the same way.

The researchers hope that their new approach could turn out to be a breakthrough in technology. A particular advantage of their new method is that molecular metal complexes are soluble in various solvents, which allows them to be very finely dispersed over very small surfaces. In addition, they provide a very high power density. This could be a way to further miniaturize fuel cells for use as power sources for biological applications like heart pacemakers and biosensors, as well as for the in-vivo monitoring of metabolic processes.

Through the right combination of a tailored molecular catalyst structure and a suitable support material, it could be possible to develop future fuel cells that very selectively convert starting materials with multiple alcohol groups into valuable premium chemicals without the generation of waste materials. This task is very difficult to accomplish by traditional methods.

Explore further: Smart crystallization

More information: Hansjorg Grützmacher, et al. A Biologically Inspired Organometallic Fuel Cell (OMFC) That Converts Renewable Alcohols into Energy and Chemicals, Angewandte Chemie International Edition 2010, 49, No. 40, 7229-7233, dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201002234

Related Stories

Biomass as a source of raw materials

May 12, 2009

For the protection of the environment, and because of the limited amount of fossil fuels available, renewable resources, such as specially cultivated plants, wood scraps, and other plant waste, are becoming the focus of considerable ...

Recommended for you

Smart crystallization

16 hours ago

A novel nucleating agent that builds on the concept of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) could allow crystallographers access to proteins and other biological macromolecules that are usually reluctant ...

Supersonic electrons could produce future solar fuel

16 hours ago

Researchers from institutions including Lund University have taken a step closer to producing solar fuel using artificial photosynthesis. In a new study, they have successfully tracked the electrons' rapid transit through ...

Aerogel catalyst shows promise for fuel cells

18 hours ago

(Phys.org)—Graphene nanoribbons formed into a three-dimensional aerogel and enhanced with boron and nitrogen are excellent catalysts for fuel cells, even in comparison to platinum, according to Rice University ...

Researchers bring clean energy a step closer

Feb 27, 2015

For nearly half a century, scientists have been trying to replace precious metal catalysts in fuel cells. Now, for the first time, researchers at Case Western Reserve University have shown that an inexpensive metal-free catalyst ...

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

MacAuley
not rated yet Sep 24, 2010
Rhodium may be a great catalyst, but it's one of the rarest and most expensive metals on earth.

Until these guys come up with a more economical and sustainable catalyst, this technology will be a laboratory curiosity.
Sonhouse
not rated yet Sep 25, 2010
And they make no mention of system efficiency, how much of the usable energy in the sugars/ethanol is converted to electricity. Does it suck up half the energy available to make those byproducts? No specs given there.
Husky
not rated yet Sep 25, 2010
use supercritical carbon dioxide as the solvent, it is the "graphene" of solvents

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.