Oracle sues Google for patent infringement

Aug 13, 2010

(AP) -- Oracle Corp. said Thursday it has filed a patent and copyright-infringement lawsuit against Google Inc.

Oracle said in a statement that Google's system for mobile phones infringes on its patented technology.

spokesman Andrew Pederson said the company can't comment because it has not yet reviewed the lawsuit.

, which makes database software and other technology, acquired the Java computer programming language and related technology when it bought Sun Microsystems. That deal that closed in January.

Java can be used as a platform for building applications for computers, websites and smart phones and other mobile devices.

In its complaint, filed with the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, Oracle said Google's Android operating system software consists of Java applications and other technology. As such, it infringes on one or more parts of seven different patents - something Google should know, Oracle argues, because it has hired former Sun Java engineers in recent years.

Oracle also said Google's Android also infringes on Oracle's copyrights in Java.

Oracle is seeking an injunction to stop Google from further building and distributing Android, plus higher monetary damages for willful and deliberate infringement.

Google says about 200,000 Android-powered phones are being sold each day.

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User comments : 7

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kevinrtrs
5 / 5 (1) Aug 13, 2010
Oooohhhh, now what exactly could be the infringement since Java is supposed to be free to use? Or isn't it?

The details would be very interesting to know.
LariAnn
not rated yet Aug 13, 2010
Isn't the issue that, if Java is free to use, yet Google is packaging and selling it, then Oracle would be entitled to a royalty on that sale based on the existing patents? That's the idea of a patent; if you produce and sell a patented product without paying royalties, you are infringing.
Aloken
5 / 5 (1) Aug 13, 2010
Isn't the issue that, if Java is free to use, yet Google is packaging and selling it, then Oracle would be entitled to a royalty on that sale based on the existing patents? That's the idea of a patent; if you produce and sell a patented product without paying royalties, you are infringing.


Google isnt selling anything... Java is a programming language, those cant be sold. Also if selling a program made with java is a patent infringment unless you pay oracle royalties then it wouldn't be widely used.

And google isn't selling android either, its also open source (not mutually exlusive).

Google makes money off of the android market and a few other related things, but not with android directly.
Donutz
not rated yet Aug 13, 2010
I think Oracle is going the way of SCO -- seeing its technological product being commoditized and subject to free/open-source competition, they're going to a lawsuit-based business model. Didn't work for SCO, either.
Royale
not rated yet Aug 13, 2010
Exactly. Moreover, Java is based on C (namely C++) So should they have to pay the creators of C++ whenever Java is used to program something? What about the thousands of profit based Java games online? (Although even that is being outpaced now by Flash-based pay games). If they win, will Adobe start suing the pants off of YoVille, FarmVille, or any of those ridiculous facebook "pay if you want" games?
frajo
not rated yet Aug 19, 2010
personalmoneystore.com/moneyblog/2010/08/16/...
You didn't even care to delete the source from your copy'n'paste quote.
Gena777
not rated yet Aug 19, 2010
Funny, in all of the media reports about this, nothing that I have read has referred to Oracle as a "patent troll." However, you can be sure that, if a smaller company had filed a patent enforcement suit to protect patents that it had recently acquired, everyone would immediately denounce it as a troll. It shows that there is a pretty strong double standard, and that a troll is in the eye of the beholder.
http://www.genera...nt-troll