NASA releases GOES-13 satellite movie of the life and times of Hurricane Alex

Jul 13, 2010
GOES-13 captured Hurricane Alex's life from June 15-July 2, 2010. After struggling across hurricane alley during the last two weeks of June, constantly torn apart by upper-level westerlies, the tropical depression reached the calm of the Gulf of Mexico, and spun up into hurricane Alex in July. Credit: NASA GOES Project

NASA's GOES Project has just released a "movie" of satellite imagery showing the life and times of 2010's only June hurricane. From birth to death, the GOES-13 satellite kept an eye on the life and times of Hurricane Alex for two weeks in June, 2010.

Hurricane Alex struggled for life for two weeks in June 2010, and the (GOES) known as GOES-13 captured satellite images of the storm. Those were compiled into an animation by Dr. Dennis Chesters of NASA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "The animation is an example of one of the tropical-storm-in-ten which bloom into a hurricane," Chesters said.

GOES-13 is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and images are created by NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Satellites like GOES-13 provide a great research tool for forecasters by showing where and how a forms and where it tracks during its brief lifetime. GOES-13 captured Alex from its birth on Friday, June 25 at 6 p.m. EDT when "System 93L" developed into the first tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season. At 5 a.m. EDT on Saturday, June 26 that Tropical Depression One strengthened into a and was named Alex. Tropical Storm Alex intensified by 11 p.m. EDT on June 29 and became the first hurricane of the 2010 Atlantic Ocean .

Alex made landfall at 10 p.m. EDT in northeastern Mexico, about 110 miles south of Brownsville, Texas. By 8 a.m. EDT on July 1, Alex has weakened to a tropical storm and GOES satellite imagery showed it moving near the high mountains of Mexico. GOES-13 followed Alex's remnants as they moved inland over northeastern Mexico and southern Texas in the days following.

The first Atlantic Ocean basin hurricane of the season proved fatal to at least 30 people. Alex's heavy rainfall flooded towns, created mudslides, caused waterways to overflow and broke records.

Explore further: NASA sees remnants of Nilofar go to cyclone graveyard

More information: To access and download the movie: goes.gsfc.nasa.gov/text/goes13results.html

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