Vampires and collisions rejuvenate stars

Dec 23, 2009
This illustration demonstrates the two ways that blue stragglers -- or "rejuvenated" stars -- in globular clusters form. The upper illustration shows the collision model where two low-mass stars in an overcrowded environment experience a head-on collision, combining their fuel and mass and to form a single hot star. The lower illustration depicts the "vampire" model consisting of a pair of stars that undergo a transformation, with the lower-mass star draining its larger-mass companion of hydrogen that fuels its rebirth. Credit: NASA/ ESA

Stars in globular clusters are generally extremely old, with ages of 12-13 billion years. However, a small fraction of them appear to be significantly younger than the average population and, because they seem to have been left behind by the stars that followed the normal path of stellar evolution and became red giants, have been dubbed blue stragglers.

Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of several hundred thousand stars. Present among the earliest inhabitants of our , they formed in the vast halo of our galaxy before it flattened to form a pancake-shaped spiral disc. essentially stopped in 13 billion years ago, so astronomers expect to find only old stars and they use globular cluster ages as a benchmark for estimating the age of the Universe.

In 1953, astronomer Allan Sandage found a puzzling new population of stars that seemed to go against the rules of stellar evolution in globular clusters. Sandage detected hot young blue stars in the globular cluster Messier 3, and subsequently in other globular clusters. He dubbed them stragglers because they looked like they were trailing or left behind by other blue stars in the cluster that had long ago evolved to the red giant stage.

This wide-field image of the sky around the globular cluster Messier 30 was created from photographs forming part of the Digitized Sky Survey 2. Located about 28 000 light-years away from Earth, this cluster -- a swarm of several hundred thousand stars -- is about 90 light-years across. The field of view is approximately 2.9 degrees across. Credit: ESO and Digitized Sky Survey 2

Blue stragglers appear to regress from "old age" back to a hotter and brighter "youth", gaining a new lease on life in the process. A team of astronomers used Hubble to study the blue straggler star content in Messier 30, which formed 13 billion years ago and was discovered in 1764 by Charles Messier. Located about 28 000 light-years away from Earth, this globular cluster — a swarm of several hundred thousand stars — is about 90 light-years across.

Although blue stragglers have been known since the early 1950s, their formation process is still an unsolved puzzle in astrophysics. "It's like seeing a few kids in the group picture of a rest-home for retired people. It is natural to wonder why they are there," says Francesco Ferraro from the University of Bologna in Italy, lead author of the study that will be published this week in Nature [3]. Researchers have been studying these stars for many years and knew that blue stragglers are indeed old. They were thought to have arisen in a tight binary system [4]. In such a pair, the less massive star acts as a "vampire", siphoning fresh hydrogen from its more massive companion star. The new fuel supply allows the smaller star to heat up, growing bluer and hotter — behaving like a star at an earlier stage in its evolution.

This brilliant image of Messier 30 (M 30) was taken by Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Messier 30 formed 13 billion years ago and was discovered in 1764 by Charles Messier. Located about 28 000 light-years away from Earth, this globular cluster -- a dense swarm of several hundred thousand stars -- is about 90 light-years across. Although globular clusters such as this one are mainly populated by old stars, the crowded field of stars leads to some old stars apparently reclaiming their youth in the form of blue stragglers. Researchers using data from Hubble's now-retired Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) have identified two types of blue stragglers in Messier 30: those that form in near head-on collisions with one another and those that are in twin (or binary) systems where the less massive star siphons "life-giving" hydrogen from its more massive companion. Credit: NASA/ ESA

The new study shows that some of the blue stragglers have instead been rejuvenated by a sort of "cosmic facelift", courtesy of cosmic collisions. These stellar encounters are nearly head-on collisions in which the stars might actually merge, mixing their nuclear fuel and re-stoking the fires of nuclear fusion. Merged stars and binary systems would both be about twice the typical mass of individual stars in the cluster.

"Our observations demonstrate that blue stragglers formed by collisions have slightly different properties from those formed by vampirism. This provides a direct demonstration that the two formation scenarios are valid and that they are both operating simultaneously in this cluster," says team member Giacomo Beccari from ESA.

Using data from the now-retired Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) aboard Hubble, astronomers found that these "straggling" stars are much more concentrated towards the centre of the cluster than the average star. "This indicates that blue stragglers are more massive than the average star in this cluster," says Ferraro. "More massive stars tend to sink deep into the cluster the way a billiard ball would sink in a bucket of honey."

The central regions of high density globular clusters are crowded neighbourhoods where interactions between stars are nearly inevitable. Researchers conjecture that one or two billion years ago, Messier 30 underwent a major "core collapse" that started to throw stars towards the centre of the cluster, leading to a rapid increase in the density of stars. This event significantly increased the number of collisions among stars, and favoured the formation of one of the families of blue stragglers. On the other hand, the increase of stellar crowding due to the collapse of the core also perturbed the twin systems, encouraging the vampirism phenomenon and thus forming the other family of blue stragglers. "Almost ten percent of galactic globular clusters have experienced core collapse, but this is the first time that we see the effect of the core collapse imprinted on a stellar population," says Barbara Lanzoni, University of Bologna.

"The two distinct populations of blue stragglers discovered in Messier 30 are the relics of the collapse of the core that occurred two billion years ago. In a broad context our discovery is direct evidence of the impact of star cluster dynamics on . We should now try to see if other globular clusters present this double population of blue stragglers," concludes Ferraro.

Explore further: A star's early chemistry shapes life-friendly atmospheres

Provided by ESA/Hubble Information Centre search and more info website

4.3 /5 (9 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Antennae Galaxies

May 19, 2008

This image of the Antennae galaxies is the sharpest yet of this merging pair of galaxies. During the course of the collision, billions of stars will be formed. The brightest and most compact of these star ...

Hubble Sees Star Cluster 'Infant Mortality'

Jan 10, 2007

Astronomers have long known that young or "open" star clusters must eventually disrupt and dissolve into the host galaxy. They simply don't have enough gravity to hold them together, unlike their much more ...

Colliding galaxies make love, not war

Oct 17, 2006

A new Hubble image of the Antennae galaxies is the sharpest yet of this merging pair of galaxies. As the two galaxies smash together, billions of stars are born, mostly in groups and clusters of stars. The ...

Neutron Star Swaps Lead to Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

Feb 02, 2006

Gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosions in the universe, emitting huge amounts of high-energy radiation. For decades their origin was a mystery. Scientists now believe they understand the processes ...

Recommended for you

A star's early chemistry shapes life-friendly atmospheres

18 hours ago

Born in a disc of gas and rubble, planets eventually come together as larger and larger pieces of dust and rock stick together. They may be hundreds of light-years away from us, but astronomers can nevertheless ...

Image: X-raying the cosmos

Apr 22, 2014

When we gaze up at the night sky, we are only seeing part of the story. Unfortunately, some of the most powerful and energetic events in the Universe are invisible to our eyes – and to even the best optical ...

Mysteries of nearby planetary system's dynamics solved

Apr 22, 2014

Mysteries of one of the most fascinating nearby planetary systems now have been solved, report authors of a scientific paper to be published by the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society in its ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

fmfbrestel
1 / 5 (1) Dec 23, 2009
"More massive stars tend to sink deep into the cluster the way a billiard ball would sink in a bucket of honey."

How amazingly random. Why not a golf ball in a bucket of molasses?
Husky
1 / 5 (1) Dec 23, 2009
i am sure there the mythbusters will repeat the famous billiard ball in honeybucket experiment

More news stories

How many moons does Venus have?

There are dozens upon dozens of moons in the Solar System, ranging from airless worlds like Earth's Moon to those with an atmosphere (most notably, Saturn's Titan). Jupiter and Saturn have many moons each, ...

First-of-its-kind NASA space-weather project

A NASA scientist is launching a one-to-two-year pilot project this summer that takes advantage of U.S. high-voltage power transmission lines to measure a phenomenon that has caused widespread power outages ...