Education Budget Cuts to Cause Increase in Mobile Technology Use

Dec 17, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- As budget cuts in education continue, we will see more use of mobile technologies in the classroom in 2010, predicts Dr. Vivian Wright, a University of Alabama educator.

“The mobility that offers can help educators save money this upcoming year,” says Wright, associate professor of instructional technology at UA. “In today’s economy, the cost of paper can be an issue. Mobile technologies can help promote a paperless classroom.”

Wright says educators will also start to see as less of an annoyance and will view mobility as a classroom learning opportunity.

“As educators, we should not ignore the magnitude of the technology our students have in their pockets - handheld devices such as cell phones, mp3 players, and digital assistants enable us to read books, get directions to a local landmark, take pictures or share video of a field trip, take notes of learning experiences, and collaborate with other students from around the world through text and video,” says Wright.

“The time is right, the technology has never been easier to use, and more and educators have mobile access to technology at their fingertips, which, in turn, offers access to multiple and easily accessible resources that allow for , engagement and interaction.”

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