Sex, videos, friends, games hot with kids online: Norton

Aug 12, 2009 by Glenn Chapman
Children are seen looking at a computer screen during an on-line electronic entertainment event in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Children are searching online for videos, social networks, games and, yes, porn as they grow up in an Internet Age, according to computer security firm Symantec.

Children are searching online for videos, social networks, games and, yes, porn as they grow up in an Internet Age, according to computer security firm Symantec.

Symantec on Tuesday released a list of the Top 100 searches conducted by children whose computers are tied to an OnlineFamily.Norton service that lets track their offspring's' Internet activities.

The most popular search term was Google-owned video-sharing hotspot , where children go for snippets ranging from Japanese anime and silly viral videos to dance routines and help with math homework.

"Seeing YouTube on top is no surprise," said Symantec Internet Safety Advocate Marian Merritt.

"Kids use YouTube as a starting place for entertainment as well as for education purposes."

Something unexpected was the tendency of children to rely on search engines to find websites such as Google, Facebook, MySpace and Yahoo! in what could be a sign that they don't fully grasp the Internet address system.

and wildly popular social-networking service were the second and third top search terms respectively.

"Sex" came in fourth, just ahead of service and "porn," which was the sixth most common query.

"Any of us who have been teenagers are not surprised kids look for information about sex," Merritt said. "I think we have all gotten over our shock that the Internet has porn."

Symantec studied 3.5 million searches made by OnlineFamily.Norton service users worldwide between February and July of this year.

Late king of pop Michael Jackson was among the top ten search queries, along with online auction pioneer and a fictional "Fred" character that is a children's favorite at YouTube.

A homemade "Swimming with Fred" video starring a pre-teen boy had logged more than 30.5 million views at YouTube as of Tuesday.

"I watch them; I don't get it," said Merritt, who has three teenagers of her own. "Perhaps that is one of the definitions separating parents from kids."

The online activity monitoring service does not secretly snoop; it announces its presence onscreen and dispatches animated dog characters to warn children when they are heading for territory set as off-limits by parents.

Merritt sees the service as helping parents stay in tune with children as their lives move increasing online.

She maintains that real-time online monitoring provides casual chances for parents and to have "The Talk" about porn, sex, trusting strangers and other delicate topics.

"You can see what they are searching; who they are instant messaging with, and what social networks they are on," Merritt said of OnlineFamily.

Since its launch in April 2009, OnlineFamily.Norton has provided parents using the service with more than 90 million "teachable moments" with their kids, according to Symantec.

"We've found through the Norton Online Living Family Survey that both parents and kids want to speak with each other more frequently about their day-to-day lives, not just the big issues," Merritt said.

OnlineFamily.Norton service is offered as a service online and is available only in English.

It is being offered free through the remainder of the year and Symantec has yet to determine what it will charge for the service.

(c) 2009 AFP

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User comments : 7

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Bob_Kob
4.3 / 5 (6) Aug 12, 2009
Something unexpected was the tendency of children to rely on search engines to find websites such as Google, Facebook, MySpace and Yahoo! in what could be a sign that they don't fully grasp the Internet address system.


I do this all the time, not because i dont grasp entering the websites, but because its just simply quicker. Entering website addresses are so MSDos.
gopher65
2 / 5 (3) Aug 12, 2009
I occasionally do too, but rarely for Google:P. In fact, I don't use search engine home pages, I just add them to my browsers built in search bar and search from there. It's faster and more convenient. Since all browsers now have a search bar, and the ability to add rival search engines (even IE:P), there is no reason to *ever* go to google.com, or yahoo.com.
Sean_W
2.3 / 5 (3) Aug 12, 2009
Yeah, I do searches for sites that I know the address to by memory because a typo will often bring up the correct title or key word to click on whereas a typo in the address bar will often lead to some parasite site selling herbal Viagra or a web hosting company. It's about saving unnecessary key strokes not ignorance.
RFC
5 / 5 (2) Aug 12, 2009
Kob - "Entering website addresses are so MSDos."

Thank you for making me feel old.
CSharpner
5 / 5 (1) Aug 12, 2009
Do y'all actually put "Google" in the google search bar?

Entering a physorg.com[Enter] in the address bar is faster than entering it (or just physorg) in the search field, waiting for a result to come back, then having to switch from keyboard to mouse to then click on it... Not to mention, in many (if not most) cases, you're clicking on a PAID link, costing your destination site money, which depletes their resources, meaning they'll have less to offer you. I have paid for my links to be on Google before, and trust me, they're NOT cheap! If every visitor to my online store got there through a paid link, it'd cost significantly MORE to get them there than anything I'd be making by selling them stuff.

STOP DOING THIS!!!

I caught my nephew doing this to go to his Mom's (my sister's) online store, costing her 25 cents every time he did it. I abruptly put an end to that.
earls
3.7 / 5 (3) Aug 12, 2009
ctrl enter, for the win.

shift enter for .net and ctrl shift enter for .org

Adblock plus, for the win.

"The online activity monitoring service does not secretly snoop; it announces its presence onscreen and dispatches animated dog characters to warn children when they are heading for territory set as off-limits by parents."

Ruff, ruff! Hi Kids, I see you're looking for some hot poontang, too bad, because not only am I telling your parents, I'm using your personal information to generate statistics for online articles. But hey, it's ok, you better get used to it! Soon the your own government will use the same technology to police your thoughts and you will be imprisoned for dissidence! But that's not a bad thing because you'll really learn a lot about sex in jail! Ruff, ruff! Lets be friends!
Velanarris
not rated yet Aug 17, 2009
Ruff, ruff! Hi Kids, I see you're looking for some hot poontang, too bad, because not only am I telling your parents, I'm using your personal information to generate statistics for online articles. But hey, it's ok, you better get used to it! Soon the your own government will use the same technology to police your thoughts and you will be imprisoned for dissidence! But that's not a bad thing because you'll really learn a lot about sex in jail! Ruff, ruff! Lets be friends!

Would that be ruff sex?

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