Nanopatches to join the fight against swine flu

Jul 14, 2009

In response to the growing threat of swine flu, a UQ team is applying nanopatch technology to potentially solve the problems associated with vaccinating millions of Australians, thanks to a recently announced government grant.

Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) researcher Professor Mark Kendall heads a team testing the potency of mass vaccinations using only a fraction of the standard dose.

The project also targets cross-protection by delivering the seasonal to protect against challenge from the swine A H1N1 .

Professor Kendall said this research used new nanopatch technology which does away with the needle and syringe and stimulated a potent immune response with a reduced dose.

“By accurately and reliably delivering the vaccine to the abundant , which are located just under of the surface of the skin, we are able to initiate a rapid and powerful immune response from the body, while using considerably less vaccine,” Professor Kendall said.

“The beauty of the nanopatch is that it could enable large-scale rapid vaccinations in a cost effective manner that is currently not available with the needle and syringe.

“The nanopatch could also potentially eliminate needle phobia and the risk of needle stick injuries while being easy and cost-effective to administer” he said.

The team includes researchers from the University of Melbourne, the Australian Animal Health lab and one of Professor Kendall's UQ collaborators, Professor Ian Frazer of UQ's Diamantina Institute for Cancer Immunology and Metabolic Medicine.

The project is supported under the fast-tracked National Health and Medical Research Council's H1N1 () Medical Research Projects.

Provided by University of Queensland (news : web)

Explore further: Gold nanorods target cancer cells

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

'Nanopatches' to replace needles

Apr 11, 2006

People who fear needles may one day have no need to fear the doctor, with the help of a funding injection for The University of Queensland's Professor Mark Kendall.

Recommended for you

Gold nanorods target cancer cells

Dec 18, 2014

Using tiny gold nanorods, researchers at Swinburne University of Technology have demonstrated a potential breakthrough in cancer therapy.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.