Expanded role for calcium channels in T-cells

A subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels was found to have a functional role in T-cells, according to a Northwestern Medicine study published in Nature Communications.

Team develops a rapid test to measure immunity to SARS-CoV-2

Mount Sinai researchers have developed a rapid blood assay that measures the magnitude and duration of someone's immunity to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. This test will allow large-scale monitoring of the population's ...

How cells navigate in messy environments

Your cells need to get around. For example, immune cells must roam around your body to locate sites of infection, and neurons must migrate to specific positions in the brain during development. But cells do not have eyes ...

Maintaining the right niche for blood cell development

In your home, storing books on a bookshelf, tools in a tool box, and a broom in a broom cupboard makes it easy to access these items whenever you need them. Within the body, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in their ...

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White blood cell

White blood cells (WBCs), or leukocytes (also spelled "leucocytes"), are cells of the immune system defending the body against both infectious disease and foreign materials. Five different and diverse types of leukocytes exist, but they are all produced and derived from a multipotent cell in the bone marrow known as a hematopoietic stem cell. Leukocytes are found throughout the body, including the blood and lymphatic system.

The number of leukocytes in the blood is often an indicator of disease. There are normally between 4×109 and 1.1×1010 white blood cells in a litre of blood, making up approximately 1% of blood in a healthy adult. An increase in the number of leukocytes over the upper limits is called leukocytosis, and in leukopenia, this number is much lower than the lower limit. The physical properties of leukocytes, such as volume, conductivity, and granularity, may change due to activation, the presence of immature cells, or the presence of malignant leukocytes in leukemia.

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