Paper from sugar cane saves trees and money

Mar 06, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new way to make paper more easily and cheaply from bagasse, the fibrous sugar cane waste from sugar production, than from trees has been discovered by a Queensland University of Technology researcher.

QUT Sugar Research & Innovation research fellow Tom Rainey has dispelled the myth that bagasse paper production would never be economically viable in Australia.

Mr Rainey said bagasse could be used to make generic writing paper, tissues and packaging, and help lower the amount of plantation and old growth forest that was cut down for paper production.

He will discuss the innovative process at a talk on March 10 presented by the Sugar Research and Development Corporation (SRDC) in association with QUT.

"My research has overcome a major technical hurdle to optimising bagasse fibre so it can be made into pulp for the production of paper, board, structural and packaging materials," Mr Rainey said.

"This process will be more profitable because the raw sugar cane material is up to five times cheaper to buy than wood, and higher paper production rates are possible."

Mr Rainey said because the majority of generic-grade paper sold in Australia was manufactured overseas, this technology could provide a new market for sugar cane growers.

Provided by Queensland University of Technology

Explore further: Spiky 'hedgehog particles' for safer paints, fewer VOC emissions

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

FACT CHECK: Both sides in Keystone XL debate bend facts

6 hours ago

Supporters of the Keystone XL pipeline, which would run from Canada to the Gulf, say the privately funded, $8 billion project is a critically needed piece of infrastructure that will create thousands of jobs ...

Recommended for you

What does Spiderman eat for breakfast?

5 hours ago

While stuck in a hotel room I got sucked into watching the 2002 Spiderman movie. And it struck me that Peter Parker must have an enormously high-protein diet to generate all that spider silk he goes through. ...

Team advances fuel cell car technology

7 hours ago

Dr. Yossef Elabd, professor in the Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering at Texas A&M University, has developed two fuel cell vehicle platforms for both present day enhancements and future innovation.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.