CERN upgrade to require removing thousands of old unused cables

January 28, 2016 by Bob Yirka weblog
The ATLAS detector. Credit: Maximilien Brice/CERN

(—As if upgrading one of the most complicated pieces of machinery in the world three years from now is not difficult enough, workers on the CERN project are also going to have to remove, according to Motherboard, approximately 9,000 old, unused cables.

Anyone who has ever looked into a cable closet knows that after some time has passed, it comes to resemble a rat's nest. The ones' at CERN have been growing since approximately 1954 when CERN was first established. Since that time, workers have been adding new cable with each upgrade to provide for new services. Unfortunately, they were not removing old cables as they became obsolete. That has led to a situation where there is no more room for putting in the new cables required for the LHC Injectors Upgrade Project scheduled for 2019.

Complicating the removal process is the difficulty in ascertaining which cables need to be removed (most of them are part of safety and control systems)—some of which wind their way through other equipment and systems areas and stretch to over half a football field in length. Pulling the wrong cable could be disastrous, because it could cause the collider to shut down, wasting valuable up-time. To handle the task, a team of 60 workers has been assembled and trained—their immediate task is to identify which cables to pull—they are comparing entries in a database of all installed cables with what they actually see in the field, and then updating the database to reflect the new reality—the team has thus far found an error rate of approximately 2 percent. The cables cannot be pulled, of course, during the time when the accelerator is in operation—that will have to wait for the annual winter maintenance shutdown (technical stop).

The team reports that in some areas, some cables have already been removed, approximately 2,700 of them, but they have also identified approximately 3,000 cables in each injector which still need to come out, adding up to 9,000 in all. Because of the sheer number of , the team will not be able to remove them all during one technical stop, they will have work on them every year until they get the job done, which they estimate will be in 2020—just in time for the major 2019 upgrade to take place.

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1 / 5 (1) Jan 28, 2016
I am wondering, when the LHC is shut down to be maintained/modified/repaired/refurbished or whatever, and then restarted, do they confirm that the so-called "Higgs bump" that they first detected is still there? Or do they just go looking for more bumps?
3 / 5 (2) Jan 28, 2016
Hope they don't have to deal with anything like these examples,

If that gives you nightmares, this will restore your sanity :)
2.3 / 5 (3) Jan 28, 2016
No worries. When they "accidentally" create that black hole, this problem will be solved.
3 / 5 (2) Jan 28, 2016
The upgrade will not invalidate any past results, it'll enable more precise measurements in the future, which may result in new ideas about things* (always a good thing).
*catch-all for everything the LHC looks at :)
not rated yet Jan 29, 2016
Dear LHC:

Dude, when the particle rapture comes, can I have all your old cables?

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